Tropical Wet Forest

Performance of an Improved Fallow System in the Peruvian Amazon—Modelling Approach

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This research compares the ecological and economic potential of an improved leguminous tree fallow (using Inga edulis) to the traditional grass fallow (dominated by Imperata brasiliensis) in central Peru.

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Use of the Amazonian Tree Species Inga edulis for Soil Regeneration and Weed Control

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This article presents research on leguminous tree-based fallows using Inga edulis in Peru.

Research Goals & Methods

Four treatments were compared over a period of nearly 3 years: 1) natural fallow, 2) fallow with I. edulis, 3) fallow with I. edulis combined with a cover crop of kudzu (Pueraria phaseoloides), and 4) continuous cropping of cassava.

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Biomass Growth and Farmer Knowledge of Inga edulis in Peruvian Amazon

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This study develops an equation for diameter-based biomass estimation of Inga edulis. The tree is widely grown in the Peruvian Amazon as a naturally occurring early-successional tree and in small farms and gardens for fruit and fuelwood.

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How to Improve Adoption of Agroforestry Systems Among Small Farmers in Peruvian Amazon

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This article surveys factors affecting the acceptibility rate of a multistrata agroforestry system.

Research Goals & Methods

Small farmers from three communities in central Peru were surveyed and data was collected on farm and houshold characteristics, cultivated crops and tree species, and agroforestry practices.

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Strategies for the Recovery of Degraded Ecosystems: Experiences from Latin America

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This paper reviews the rehabilitation potential of native species forest plantations in lowland Costa Rica, the Atlantic Forest of Bahia, Brazil, and sub-tropical Argentina. Native species can improve forest regeneration where soils are degraded and where sources of propagules are limited. While most tropical plantations are dominated by exotic species, native trees may be more appropriate because they are better adapted to the local environment, are already familiar to local farmers, and their propagules are locally available.

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Public Awareness Generation for the Reforestation in Amazon Tropical Lowland Region

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This study compares two plots of native tree species, one that was planted with small numbers of species representing potential natural vegetation and another that was planted with many species, including fast-growing pioneers.

Research Goals & Methods

After 9 years, tree height, DBH, species composition, stand volume, tree density and species diversity were measured in both plots.

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Silvicultural and economic aspects of pure and mixed native tree species plantations on degraded pasturelands in humid Costa Rica

Background

Reforestation of degraded land in tropical regions provides one means of restoring ecosystems and improving rural livelihoods. Most plantations in humid tropical regions are established in pure plots using few species of high commercial value, generally exotics. This study compares growth and economic viability of native trees in pure and mixed plantations on degraded land.

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Optimising Seedling Management: Pouteria sapota, Diospyros digyna, and Cedrela odorata in a Mexican Rainforest

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This study compares the height growth of three native tree species (Pouteria sapota, Diospyros digyna, and Cedrela odorata) during the first two years after transplantation from a nursery in three plot types (primary rainforest, secondary forest, and open pasture) in Veracruz, Mexico.

Research Goals & Methods

The effects of canopy closure, leaf nutrients, initial seedling height and seed mass on the final height of the plant after two years were analyzed.

Open access copy available

Restoration of a Sri-Lankan rainforest: Using Caribbean Pine Pinus caribaea as a nurse for establishing late-successional tree species

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In the moist tropics, studies have demonstrated poor seedling establishment of late-successional trees on lands cleared of forest. This study examines the potential for establishing late-successional tree species that dominate the canopy of rainforest by planting within and adjacent to experimental openings that were created within a Pinus caribaea plantation.

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Forest Plantations in Costa Rica and Nicaragua: Performance of Species and Preferences of Farmers

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This paper presents data on the survival and growth of mixed native and exotic forest plantations established on abandoned pastures in Costa Rica and Nicaragua. The article also includes information on farmer species preference and socioeconomic information.

Open access copy available
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