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Trade-offs at applying tree nucleation to restore degraded high Andean forests in Colombia

Background

This article recognizes applied nucleation as a forest restoration strategy in many low to mid altitude forests and aims to compare applied nucleation to passive regeneration at high altitude forests. Applied nucleation is successful at accelerating the speed of forest regeneration, improving soil conditions, and shading out invasive species in many low-mid altitude forests of the neotropics. There are gaps in the literature about the performance of applied nucleation in other tropical regions as well as high attitude tropical forests.

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A cautionary note for forest landscape restoration in drylands: cattle production systems in northwest Madagascar’s dry forests

BACKGROUND

It is evident that land tenure security is crucial for successful restoration. Unfortunately, in Madagascar, dry forests are considered unoccupied and unowned even when communities have long-established claims under customary tenure systems. The authors stated that collective tenure recognition efforts were underway in Madagascar, but limited knowledge of agropastoralist cattle production strategies impeded the efforts to develop tenure reforms. The authors examined how cattle raisers in the Boney Region in northwest Madagascar organize pastoral spaces and cattle production strategies in the area’s dry forest.

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Tropical surface gold mining: A review of ecological impacts and restoration strategies

BACKGROUND

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Tropical surface gold mining: A review of ecological impacts and restoration strategies

BACKGROUND

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Tropical surface gold mining: A review of ecological impacts and restoration strategies

BACKGROUND

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Filling a void: Analysis of early tropical soil and vegetative recovery under leguminous, post-coal mine reforestation plantations in East Kalimantan, Indonesia

BACKGROUND

Surface mining is a common practice for obtaining coal, the world’s leading energy source. Surface mining removes vegetation, soil, and rocks to extract resources. In Indonesia, the world’s fifth largest coal producer, coal mining companies are required to rehabilitate mined sites. Companies typically plant exotic legume tree species because they quickly achieve canopy closure, limit invasive weeds, improve soil nitrogen, and create a light environment that helps with the recruitment of woody plants. This article looks to see whether natural forest succession occurs under leguminous plantations at rehabilitated coal mines in East Kalimantan, Indonesia. 

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Adaptation of five co-occurring tree and shrub species to water stress and its implication in restoration of degraded lands

BACKGROUND

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Introduction to the Special Issue on “Interdisciplinarity in Geography Educational Experiences Abroad”

Background

The authors provide an overview of the articles in a special issue of the journal The Geography Teacher on interdisciplinarity in geography study abroad programs.

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Cash for conservation: Do payments for ecosystem services work?

Background

Payments for ecosystem services (PES) programs make payments to land owners for the ecosystem services such as clean water or carbon storage that their land provides to create incentives to protect the land. One of the objectives of these projects is to promote local economic development along with conservation outcomes. Researchers have sought to critically assess the assumptions behind these programs and their implementation.

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Payments for ecosystem services and the fatal attraction of win-win solutions

Background

Payments for ecosystem services (PES) programs involve valuing and paying stewards of ecosystems for the services that these ecosystems create incentives for conserving them. These programs are sometimes characterized as ‘win-win’ solutions, with the potential to contribute to both biodiversity conservation and poverty reduction. The authors of this paper review the literature on PES programs and highlight some challenges of implementing them.

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