Hieronyma alchorneoides

Iniciativas de reforestación con especies forestales nativas de la Universidad EARTH (Reforestation efforts with native forest species)

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Productividad en plantaciones puras y mixtas de especies forestales nativas en la estación biológica La Selva, Sarapiquí, Costa Rica

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Silvicultural and economic aspects of pure and mixed native tree species plantations on degraded pasturelands in humid Costa Rica

Background

Reforestation of degraded land in tropical regions provides one means of restoring ecosystems and improving rural livelihoods. Most plantations in humid tropical regions are established in pure plots using few species of high commercial value, generally exotics. This study compares growth and economic viability of native trees in pure and mixed plantations on degraded land.

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Strategies for the Recovery of Degraded Ecosystems: Experiences from Latin America

background

This paper reviews the rehabilitation potential of native species forest plantations in lowland Costa Rica, the Atlantic Forest of Bahia, Brazil, and sub-tropical Argentina. Native species can improve forest regeneration where soils are degraded and where sources of propagules are limited. While most tropical plantations are dominated by exotic species, native trees may be more appropriate because they are better adapted to the local environment, are already familiar to local farmers, and their propagules are locally available.

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Forest Plantations in Costa Rica and Nicaragua: Performance of Species and Preferences of Farmers

background

This paper presents data on the survival and growth of mixed native and exotic forest plantations established on abandoned pastures in Costa Rica and Nicaragua. The article also includes information on farmer species preference and socioeconomic information.

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Attempting Restoration of Wet Tropical Forests in Costa Rica

Background

This article describes a reforestation effort of the Tropical Forestry Initiative using mixed stands of native species to recover abandoned pastureland in the tropical wet forest of Costa Rica.

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Environmental Services of Native Tree Plantations and Agroforestry Systems in Central America

Background

Plantations and agroforestry systems supply wood and environmental services such as carbon sequestration and recovery of biodiversity. At the time of writing (2004), Central American countries were developing systems of payments for environmental services to encourage the development of these systems.

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Payments for Environmental Services in Latin America as a Tool for Restoration and Rural Development

Background

Two Payments for Environmental Services (PES) projects are assessed in this article: 1) a bundled PES system in forestry projects in Costa Rica, and 2) the Regional Integrated Silvopastoral Approaches to Ecosystem Management Project in Costa Rica, Nicaragua and Colombia. The first project based PED on the provision of four different environmental services (carbon sequestration, biodiversity conservation, watershed protection, and aesthetic improvements and/or maintenance of the landscape) within the same plot of land. The second project implemented PES proportional to carbon sequestration and biodiversity outputs by participants.

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Growth characteristics of some native tree species used in silvopastoral systems in the humid lowlands of Costa Rica

Background

Degraded pastures established throughout Central America in the latter 20th C are gradually transitioning to silvopasture or secondary forest. Understanding growth characteristics of trees on these lands is important for proper management.

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Can Native Tree Species Plantations in Panama Compete with Teak Plantations? An Economic Estimation

background

Panama has high rates of primary forest conversion, resulting in depleted timber resources. In response, the timber plantation industry is growing to meet demand, often with non-native species. This study compares the economic feasibility of using native tree species vs non-native species for plantation forestry.

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