Tabebuia rosea

Is Tree Diversity an Important Driver for Phosphorus and Nitrogen Acquisition of a Young Tropical Plantation?

background

This article presents the effect of native species diversity on the nitrogen and phosphorous pools above-ground in a plantation in the Canal Zone of Panama.

Available with subscription or purchase

Root architecture and allocation patterns of eight native tropical species with different successional status used in open-grown mixed plantations in Panama

Background

While an increasing number of native tropical trees are under study for reforestation and commercial plantations, the majority of studies on trees in the tropics have concentrated on the aboveground aspects of tree growth. This study investigates biomass allocation and root architecture of eight tropical species with different successional status.

Open access copy available

Screening trial of 14 tropical hardwoods with an emphasis on species native to Costa Rica: Fourth year results

Background

Commercial forestry plantations have consistently relied on a limitd number of species, often favoring exotic species over native ones. This is mainly due to a lack of information or understanding related to the silviculture of native species plantations. This article uses a long-term experiement site in Costa Rica's La Selva Biological Station to work towards filling this knowledge gap. 

Available with subscription or purchase

Linking Multiple-Level Tree Traits with Biomass Accumulation in Native Tree Species used for Reforestation in Panama

background

This research presents the links between biomass accumulation, plant traits, and functional groups for five native species in abandoned pasture of central Panama.

Open access copy available

Biomass Distribution Among Tropical Tree Species Grown Under Differing Regional Climates

background

This study presents results from species selection trials in Panama as part of the PRORENA project, which examined the most effective species and methods for Panamanian government-supported reforestation projects.

research goal & methods

In 2003, 16 native and 2 exotic species were planted in single-species plots with a 3m x 3m spacing of trees at two different sites (one seasonally wet, one more dry). All plots were thinned to 50% of their original density at two years after plantation establishment, and the thinned trees were measured for biomass and biomass partitioning.

Open access copy available

An Evaluation of Farmers' Experiences Planting Native Trees in Rural Panama: Implications for Reforestation with Native Species in Agricultural Landscapes

background

The Panamanian government has created reforestation incentive programs to encourage farmers to plant trees in order to restore ecosystem services to degraded lands. However, many farmers and landowners choose not to participate in these programs. Additionally, many such incentive programs result in large plantations of non-native species. In 2001, the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute created a native species reforestation project known as PRORENA (Proyecto de Reforestación con Especias Nativas) to study strategies for successful native species reforestation in a social, economic, and scientific context.

Open access copy available
Subscribe to Tabebuia rosea