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Aboveground carbon responses to experimental and natural hurricane impacts in a subtropical wet forest in Puerto Rico

Background

Carbon sequestration is a major climate mitigating process. Tropical forests in particular sequester high amounts of carbon, however disturbance events such as storms can alter the ability of forests to sequester more carbon. Hurricanes create forest gaps and increase ground debris which both provide resources that may promote plant recruitment and growth.

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Patterns and controls on island-wide aboveground biomass accumulation in second-growth forests of Puerto Rico

Background

Secondary or second-growth forests after land abandonment are a valuable contribution to global carbon sinks. Approximately 70% of the world’s tropical forests are secondary growth, so understanding the carbon sequestration rates on a large scale is important. Sequestration rates are controlled by both abiotic and biotic factors in each region.

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Exotic Eucalypts: From Demonized Trees to Allies of Tropical Forest Restoration?

Background:

Timber, being a product in high demand globally, presents a lucrative market opportunity, and restoration efforts could potentially generate income through the targeted extraction of this material. While the incorporation of commercially valuable exotic trees might incentivize farmers to participate in restoration projects, it raises significant ecological concerns among experts.

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Mining in the Amazon: Importance, impacts, and challenges to restore degraded ecosystems. Are we on the right way?

Background:

With mining playing a significant role in the economies of Amazonian countries, there is a growing urgency to understand, mitigate, and restore the degraded ecosystems that result from these mining operations. These tasks present a complex set of challenges, including technological limitations, legal inconsistencies, and a shortage of qualified professionals.

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Evaluating the success of direct seeding for tropical forest restoration over ten years

Background

The main causes of deforestation in the Amazon are large-scale agriculture and cattle ranching, which have led to the loss of millions of hectares of forest. To address this issue, different mechanisms have been implemented since 2005 to reduce deforestation and increase forest restoration.  However, highly modified, degraded areas with a long history of use may take a long time to regenerate naturally or may not recover into a secondary forest. Therefore, active restoration methods are needed to accomplish this massive obligation.

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Direct seeded and colonizing species guarantee successful early restoration of South Amazon forests

Background

South Amazon forests have been highly deforested, including the legally protected riparian forests. Direct seeding is a low cost method, easy-to-implement at large scale. The authors emphasize the imperative to reduce the costs and enhance the outcomes of restoration efforts, which have become mainstream solutions in countering biodiversity loss and climate change around the world.

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Discolouring the Amazon Rainforest: how deforestation is affecting butterfly coloration

Background

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Carbon loss and removal due to forest disturbance and regeneration in the Amazon

Background:

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Restoring soil carbon and chemical properties through silvopastoral adoption in the Colombian Amazon region

Background:

The traditional livestock production in this region causes the loss of forest areas each year, leading to soil degradation and loss of biodiversity. Silvopastoral systems have become an attractive alternative with positive effects for the environment, society, and the regional economy. The study was conducted in two counties in the northwestern Colombian Amazon, which are representative of the hilly landscape typical for Silvopastoral systems implementation. 

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Carbon sequestration and nutrient cycling in agroforestry systems on degraded soils of Eastern Amazon, Brazil

Background:

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Co-benefits in biodiversity conservation and carbon stock during forest regeneration in a preserved tropical landscape

Background:

Recognizing the connection between carbon stock and biodiversity has become more crucial in light of the requirements set by international agreements. Consequently, a vital and indispensable measure for guiding relevant global environmental initiatives is to empirically investigating the potential advantages of restoring degraded areas through forest regeneration. This approach aims to boost both aboveground carbon stock and biodiversity, moving them closer to their natural levels.

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Maximizing biodiversity conservation and carbon stocking inrestored tropical forests

Background:

Ecological restoration plays a critical role in fragmented mega-diverse regions, particularly for endangered species with low dispersal rates. Species with impoverished populations, limited dispersal capacity, and important functionsas food resources for animals should be prioritized for active reintroduction in order to increase the conservation value ofrestored forests. However, seedlings from these species are often hard to find or too costly to include in many restoration projects.

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Large carbon sink potential of secondary forests in the Brazilian Amazon to mitigate climate change

Background:

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The carbon sink of secondary and degraded humid tropical forests

Background:

The Forest and Land use Declaration from the 26th Climate Change Conference of the Parties underscores the crucial role of tropical moist forests  as a nature-based solution to address climate and ecological emergencies. However, the Amazon, Borneo, and Central Africa forests experience ongoing forest cover losses due to various anthropogenic drivers. This has led to a mosaic of recovering forests at different stages post-disturbance, with limited understanding of their impact on forest carbon dynamics. 

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