Erythrina poeppigiana

Testing Applied Nucleation as a Strategy to Facilitate Tropical Forest Recovery

Background

This study considers applied nucleation, or the intensive planting of small patches of a mixture of successional species, as a degraded tropical forest restoration strategy. This approach catalyzes the natural regeneration of the surrounding matrix and larger landscape and could provide a less expensive alternative to the more common, and expensive, plantation-style approach. This study claims to be the first to directly compare tree recruitment beneath these two restoration approaches.

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Seed rain under tree islands planted to restore degraded lands in a tropical agricultural landscape

Background

Planting native tree seedlings is the predominant restoration strategy for accelerating forest succession on degraded lands. However, planting tree “islands” is less costly and labor intensive than establishing larger plantations and simulates the nucleation process of succession. Tree islands can attract seed dispersers to gradually spread restoration patterns from the islands. Restoration design can be informed by assessing the effect of potential planting arrangements on seed dispersal by birds and bats and determining the influence of surrounding forest cover.

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Migratory Bird Species in Young Tropical Forest Restoration Sites: Effects of Vegetation Height, Planting Design, and Season

background

This study examines the difference in habitat preference of four migratory birds in restored forests in southern Costa Rica.

Open access copy available

Patch Size Effects on Avian Foraging Behaviour: Implications for Tropical Forest Restoration Design

background

This study looks at bird behavior in restoration sites in southern Costa Rica. While multiple studies examine the presence of birds in restored forest, few studies examine behavior in these sites.

Open access copy available

Vinculación entre el sustento de los agricultores, los árboles y el proceso de agua y suelos en las buenas prácticas de gestión de áreas de captación (Linking farmers livelihoods, trees and soils in water catchments management practices)

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Restauración ecológica de bosques tropicales en Costa Rica: efecto de varios modelos en la producción, acumulación y descomposición de hojarasca

 

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Antecedentes

Este estudio se llevó a cabo en Coto Brus, y se enfoca en la restauración de paisajes agrícolas fragmentados dentro del Corredor Biológico Amistosa. El mismo es un área prioritaria para la forestería y la conservación en Costa Rica que ha sido degradrada y transformada por la expansión agrícola durante los pasados 50 años, dejando solo un 25% del bosque original.

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A Review of the Agroforestry Systems of Costa Rica

Background

This literature review provides a historical overview of agroforestry systems in Costa Rica from the 1970s to the present.

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Shade management in coffee and cacao plantations

Background

Shade trees reduce the stress of coffee (Coffea spp.) and cacao (Theobroma cacao) by ameliorating adverse climatic conditions and nutritional imbalances and increase the biodiversity of coffee farms, but they may also compete for growth resources. This review summarizes the literature on ecological aspects of shade-grown coffee and cacao and on management of shade trees, but does not address economic and social aspects of shade-grown coffee and cacao.

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Coffee Agroforestry Systems in Central America: II. Development of a Simple Process-Based Model and Preliminary Results

Background

Globally, coffee (Coffea arabica, L.) is an important cash crop. In past decades, there was  a growing trend  in Central America towards  high-input monocultures, but most recently, agroforestry is again becoming a common system. However, it is difficult to optimise the selection of shade tree species in an agroforestry system. This article provides information on a simple dynamic model for coffee-agroforestry systems in Central America.

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Coffee Agroforestry Systems in Central America: I. A Review of Quantitative Information on Physiological and Ecological Processes

Background

Coffee (Coffea arabica, L.) is the most widely grown cash crop in Central America.  While previous research identified various environmental factors that affect its growth and yield, the authors believe  that quantitative knowledge of coffee and other tropical agroforestry systems is still limited. This article provides both a literature review and a summary of quantitative data necessary to develop process-based models for coffee agroforestry systems in Central America.

Open access copy available
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