Journal Articles

The contributions of Indigenous Peoples and local communities to ecological restoration

Background

Indigenous Peoples and local communities often rely on their local environment to meet their basic needs, and so are affected by global environmental change. They also contribute to ecological restoration through supporting species selection and providing information on the historical state of the ecosystem. However, the authors point out that involving IPLCs does not always lead to improve restoration outcomes. They outline strategies to integrate indigenous and local knowledge into programs to improve restoration outcomes.

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Balancing land sharing and sparing approaches to promote forest and landscape restoration in agricultural landscapes: Land approaches for forest landscape restoration

BACKGROUND

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Could 2021–2030 be the decade to couple new human values with ecological restoration? Valuable insights and actions are emerging from the Colombian Amazon

BACKGROUND

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How feasible are global forest restoration commitments?

BACKGROUND

Many countries pledged large pieces of land for Forest Landscape Restoration to the Bonn challenge and the UNFCCC Paris Accords. The highest pledges came from the global South. Two countries have met their Bonn challenge so far. Some countries are facing challenges including deficit of the land committed, and there are competing land uses between FLR agricultural land.

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Farmer-Managed Natural Regeneration Enhances Rural Livelihoods in Dryland West Africa

BACKGROUND

Farmer Managed Natural Regeneration, (FMNR), has been adopted in the drylands of West Africa, i.e., the northernmost region of Ghana. This is an approach which encourages the regeneration of woody plant cover in farming and mixed land use areas for arable land restoration and reforestation. Farmers in this region practice smallholder pastoralism and seasonal rain fed crop farming for subsistence and market purposes. FMNR has been adopted as a solution to low agricultural productivity. Previous studies only focused on the economic contribution of FMNR.

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The ecology and management of the Miombo woodlands for sustainable livelihoods in southern Africa: the case for non-timber forest products

BACKGROUND

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Potential impacts of COVID-19 on tropical forest recovery

BACKGROUND

Ecosystem Restoration is one of the goals of several organizations including the UN.  COVID-19 pandemic has brought uncertainties in achieving these goals as focus has shifted to the health sector and rebuilding the economy. Two, UN critical meetings have been delayed; platforms for governments to publicly participate in tracking restoration progress and making new commitments. Other environmental changes have also been noted including wildlife’s response to the sudden absence of humans and improved air quality in many major cities. 

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Tree planting is not a simple solution

BACKGROUND

Tree planting has been identified as a panacea for environmental problems leading to the initiation of large- scale reforestation projects by governments and non- profit organizations. Many of the top- down reforestation projects have failed and have not been properly done, resulting in negative outcomes e.g., destruction of native grasslands in the savannas, increased social inequity among smallholders and dispossessing the local people.

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Short term responses of soil microarthropod community to clear felling and alternative forest regeneration methods

BACKGROUND

Clear felling is being criticized to be contributing to a reduction in biodiversity and negatively impacting ecosystem functioning. This study uses soil microarthropods as good indicators of ecological effects of forest harvesting after clear felling. It is conducted in four sites in central Finland, on spruce stands when the soil is frozen to minimize damage on the forest floor. 

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Structural diversity and regeneration of the endangered Prunus africana (Rosaceae) in Zimbabwe

BACKGROUND

Prunus Africana is widely recognized for its medicinal purposes resulting in high unsustainable use and selling in the international market. Its bark contains many healing properties. Overexploitation has led to its listing in CITES list of endangered species. A remnant population is still available at the Eastern Highlands of Zimbabwe however, the area is prone to land use changes.

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