Research Article

Plant Respiration in a Warmer World

Background:

It has been estimated that, globally, plants release 60 gigatons of CO2 during the respiration process. Many studies have shown that an increase in global temperature will increase leaves respiration rates, which in turn will decrease carbon uptake and increase atmospheric CO2 concentration (contributing even more to higher global temperature).

Available with subscription or purchase

Deforestation-Induced Climate Change Reduces Carbon Storage in Remaining Tropical Forests

Background:

Deforestation of tropical forests alters the biophysical properties of the forest's surface, which contributes to regional warming and drying. These environmental changes, in turn, could impact non-degraded forests, reducing the rates of photosynthesis and increasing the release of carbon through autotrophic respiration, as well as the risk of a wildfire. Consequently, it is important to improve the accuracy of carbon and climate benefits of a land management action (e.g., avoided deforestation) to enable a more effective valuation of the carbon credits issued for a specific project.

Open access copy available

Higher Fire Frequency Impaired Woody Species Regeneration in a South-Eastern Amazonian Forest

Background:

The more and more common forest fires in the Amazon rainforest, caused after fire escape from pasture or deforested lands, cause unpredictable changes to the forest structure. Therefore, it is essential to assess the resilience of these ecosystems after being impacted by fire events and the likelihood of maintaining forest tree species and not being replaced by savanna species.

Available with subscription or purchase

Calibrating Nepal’s scientific forest management practices in the measure of forest restoration

Background

 

Goals and Methods

 

Conclusions and Takeaways

Open access copy available

Patterns and controls on island-wide aboveground biomass accumulation in second-growth forests of Puerto Rico

Background

Secondary or second-growth forests after land abandonment are a valuable contribution to global carbon sinks. Approximately 70% of the world’s tropical forests are secondary growth, so understanding the carbon sequestration rates on a large scale is important. Sequestration rates are controlled by both abiotic and biotic factors in each region.

Open access copy available

Aboveground carbon responses to experimental and natural hurricane impacts in a subtropical wet forest in Puerto Rico

Background

Carbon sequestration is a major climate mitigating process. Tropical forests in particular sequester high amounts of carbon, however disturbance events such as storms can alter the ability of forests to sequester more carbon. Hurricanes create forest gaps and increase ground debris which both provide resources that may promote plant recruitment and growth.

Open access copy available

Optimal restoration for pollination services increases forest cover while doubling agricultural profits

Background

In the midst of a global biodiversity crisis and a rapidly expanding food demand, improving agricultural techniques is a high priority. Pollinators are at the forefront of this restoration goal partially due to their rapid decline in population, and also their crucial role in food production. 75% of globally common food depends on pollinators. Though improving agriculture is important, it is also expensive and risky for land owners. A framework is needed to determine best arrangements and practices for sustainable agriculture.

Open access copy available

Tree diversity in a tropical agricultural‑forest mosaic landscape in Honduras

Background

Tropical forests hold high biodiversity values, but are also valued for agricultural land uses. Particularly in Central America, a region with particularly high biodiversity, intensive land management practices have reduced and continue to reduce forest and species abundance. There is a push to change land use practices in order to restore and promote biodiversity, though the potential for biodiversity on agricultural landscapes is an understudied subject.

Open access copy available

Soil Biological Activity, Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics in Modified Coffee Agroforestry Systems in Mexico

Background

Coffee agroforestry systems bring a plethora of economic, social, and ecological benefits. Specifically, they aid soil biological activity. In Mexico, due to cost and production challenges, coffee is being replaced by avocado plantations. The impact of coffee agroforestry systems on specific soil biological characteristics and processes is not fully understood. Nor are the impacts of avocado plantations on soil biological activity.

Open access copy available

Bird Assemblages in Coffee Agroforestry Systems and Other Human Modified Habitats in Indonesia

Background

Deforestation in tropical regions such as Indonesia is mainly driven by need for agricultural expansion. Agroforestry systems for a major agricultural crop, coffee, are becoming increasingly popular as the need for forest restoration is more apparent. Coffee agroforestry provides benefits to biodiversity, though specific impacts of coffee shade trees on bird populations outside of the Neotropics and Africa are understudied. Birds are a highly important taxa and serve many vital ecological roles.

Open access copy available
Subscribe to Research Article