Research Article

Spatial patterns and drivers of smallholder oil palm expansion within peat swamp forests of Riau, Indonesia

Background

Tropical peat swamps are a major carbon sink, and therefore critical for meeting global climate goals. There is also rapid loss of these ecosystem types due to agriculture practices and drainage. Oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) is often planted in drained peat swamps for production. Policies in Indonesia drive smallholder oil palm farms into peatlands and prevent their access to industrial fields.

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Fire and tree species diversity in tropical peat swamp forests

Background

Indonesia houses a large quantity of peat swamps, an ecosystem type that contains diverse plant species, and provides a habitat for endangered animals. Peat swamps are degraded due to logging and agriculture expansion, specifically with the use of fire. Peat swamps are highly susceptible to fires due to peat flammability. Peat swamps also house a large quantity of carbon, so restoration is a high priority.

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Disrupted montane forest recovery hinders biodiversity conservation in the tropical Andes

Background

In the U.N. Decade on Restoration, recovering degraded forests is a high priority. Andean montane forests are a biodiversity hotspot, storing large quantities of carbon, and providing many sources for human livelihood. Many parts of the Andean forests are recovering after agriculture abandonment, but it is not yet known how the dynamics of these recovery processes progress over time. Knowledge of forest regeneration trajectory is crucial for further restoration planning.

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Listening for change: quantifying the impact of ecological restoration on soundscapes in a tropical dry forest

Background

Tropical forest host a large portion of global biodiversity and carbon reserves. Heavy loss of these landscapes calls for restoration projects to conserve biodiversity as well as other ecosystem services related to human livelihood. Tropical dry forests are understudied compared to tropical wet forests, though they contain similar quantities of biodiversity, carbon, and sources for livelihood. One threat to tropical forest restoration is species invasion, which is linked to reduced native vegetation and habitat.

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Assisted restoration interventions drive functional recovery of tropical wet forest tree communities

Background

Integrating science and practice is one of the main goals of the U.N. Decade on Ecosystem Restoration. A variety of factors can influence the application of restoration treatments across tropical ecosystems. Deciding where to apply a restoration strategy on the spectrum between natural regeneration an active restoration planting can be challenging and there is not enough current knowledge that compares these methods.

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Identifying hotspots for ecosystem restoration across heterogeneous tropical savannah-dominated regions

Background

In the U.N. Decade on Ecosystem Restoration, ecological restoration projects are a valuable tool for meeting global sustainability climate goals. Tropical regions are at the center of attention for their high biodiversity, carbon sink, and benefits to culture and human livelihood. Tropical dry savannahs are understudied even though they cover a large portion of tropical regions. Savannah dominated landscapes are valuable for their high plant diversity and vegetation type variation and high species turnover. Benefits to restoring these ecosystem types are also understudied.

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Tropical forest restoration under future climate change

Background

Climate change mitigation requires a large amount of carbon sequestration from the atmosphere. One major avenue for accomplishing this is looking to tropical forests. These ecosystems are heavy carbon sinks and bring a multitude of benefits to people and the planet. However, these ecosystems are frequently degraded and forest restoration projects may be hindered in the future due to altered fire regimes, extreme heat or drought, and other characteristics of severe climate change.

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A standard framework for assessing the costs and benefits of restoration: introducing The Economics of Ecosystem Restoration

Background

Policy behind restoration projects and efforts is stronger than ever before, however the funding and financial structure to keep these efforts going is drastically underdeveloped. Ecological restoration finance is not usually in the expertise of restoration practitioners and communities, thus requiring those people to bring in someone with that expertise for aid. The authors emphasize that restoration projects are long-term investments and therefore a better financial understanding is needed to properly plan and execute those projects. Better understanding the costs and benefits of restoration will help gain easier access to financial support.

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Ecosystem restoration job creation potential in Brazil

Background

Ecosystem restoration is recognized globally for its environmental benefits. Other benefits from ecosystem restoration such as job creation may be of high interest to key stakeholders. The leverage of job creation may motivate additional investments and long-term commitment from stakeholders into restoration projects.

Goals and Methods

The authors aim to assess ecosystem restoration jobs in Brazil based on an online survey. Job structure, distribution, and abundance are measured. In total, the authors analyze results from 356 organizations’ responses covering almost the entirety of Brazilian estates.

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Regeneration Status and Role of Traditional Ecological Knowledge for Cloud Forest Ecosystem Restoration in Ecuador

Background

Forests are a crucial component of global biodiversity. Ecuador has a long history of deforestation and forest degradation. Historical contexts such as colonization and governmental initiatives have shaped and will continue to shape the way people and forests interact. Emerging evidence supports the integration of traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) into ecological restoration practices in order to more effectively manage natural resources while incorporating the needs of local communities. The authors use this study to evaluate human disturbance impacts on cloud forest species and what TEK in the area can provide to aid in restoration.

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