Research Article

Nitrogen-fixing trees inhibit growth of regenerating Costa Rican rainforests

BACKGROUND

Nitrogen fixing plants are the primary source of nitrogen in forests, and it is expected that more nitrogen fixers will bring in faster growth. Hence this study conducted, in a humid tropical rainforest North- East Costa Rica, challenged this notion. The area of study had similar dominant species, with P. macroloba being the most dominant Nitrogen fixer.

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Pest management through tropical tree conservation

Background

Deforestation and crop monocultures in Veracruz, Mexico are leading to the disappearance of indigenous trees and the animal species that depend on them. This is particularly troubling to local agricultural workers who benefit from species like hymenopteran parasitoids that attack pest fruit flies. This research evaluates the relationship between hymenopteran parasitoids, pest fruit flies and their fruit hosts and proposes potential strategies for conservation and pest management.

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Safety Nets, Gap Filling and Forests: A Global-Comparative Perspective

BACKGROUND

This paper seeks to prove how forests and wildlands are utilized in developing countries as safety nets to shocks, and how they provide resources for seasonal gap filling. The study was carried out in various developing countries in different continents. Areas where there is no forest at all were excluded and those completely forest covered such as those dominated by hunter- gatherers were not considered.

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Impact of Forest Management on Insect Abundance and Damage in a Lowland Tropical Forest in Southern Cameroon

Background

A burgeoning timber industry in Cameroon, which became the fifth largest producer of timber in the world in the 1990’s, led to unsustainably high deforestation rates and high demand for forest regeneration interventions. Research in the Mbalmayo Forest Reserve in southern Cameroon has compared different silvicultural techniques for forest regeneration including complete and partial clearance methods.

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Leaf litter arthropod responses to tropical forest restoration

Background

Soil and litter arthropods play critical roles in tropical ecosystem function including driving organic matter decomposition and nitrogen mineralization. With the increasing need for forest restoration projects, it is important to know how these arthropod communities respond to a variety of restoration strategies and techniques in order to maintain healthy ecosystem function. This study was conducted in a mixed-use agricultural landscape in southern Costa Rica, in an effort to contribute to local restoration research efforts.

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Fuelwood collection and its impacts on a protected tropical mountain forest in Uganda.

Background

This study examined the patterns, effects and potential management of fuelwood extraction on the forest of Mt Elgon, located in the Eastern part of Uganda, Sub- Saharan Africa. Fuelwood is the main source of energy, mainly collected from the forest. 98% of the households use fuelwood and charcoal for cooking and heating. This is a protected area with a history of conflict between surrounding populations and conservation actors. No other forest remains in its direct vicinity.

Research goals and Methods

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Applied nucleation facilitates tropical forest recovery: Lessons learned from a 15‐year study

Background

This study examines the technique of applied nucleation, which is based on the planting of tree islands, as a means of cost-effective assisted natural regeneration. 

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Accelerating tropical forest restoration through the selective removal of pioneer species

background

This study presents initial findings on the impact of thinning on recovery of a selectively logged secondary forest in Sumatra. The study tests the hypothesis that thinning of pioneer species will produce stands with greater proportional basal area of late-successional species, effectively accelerating succession of the stand. 

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Genetic Consequences of Tropical Second-Growth Forest Regeneration

Background

This article is an examination of the genetic impacts of old-growth deforestation among 24 year-old second-growth Iriartea deltoidea, a canopy palm, in a lowland Costa Rican forest. Iriartea is widely distributed throughout neotropical rainforests and displays a diverse range of size classes in mature forests. This species recolonizes second-growth forests with newly generated seeds, which are dispersed by birds and mammals.

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Secondary Forest Regeneration under Fast-Growing Forest Plantations on Degraded Imperata cylindrica Grasslands

Background

This study compares the regeneration of native tree species under the canopy of tree plantations, riverine areas, and uncultivated grassland areas in the Riam Kiwa plantation area of South Kalimantan, Indonesia. This area has a distinct dry season and deeply weathered, acidic soils, and is considered good for forest plantations.

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