Sub-Saharan Africa

Management of non-timber forestry products extraction: Local institutions, ecological knowledge and market structure in South-Eastern Zimbabwe

BACKGROUND

Sengwe communal lands, in South East Zimbabwe were used to examine how they manage non timber forest products (NTFPs) as a common pool resource in that area. The area consists of five wards, of which four are communally owned. The government has a protected area engulfed by the local communal property system; both communal and state property regimes are involved in the management of certain resources.

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Fires in exotic forest plantations of Zimbabwe: Causes and management strategies

BACKGROUND

Of the 201,704-ha allocated to plantation forestry in Zimbabwe, 95,754-ha is usable. Forest plantations are mainly composed of Eucalyptus, Wattle and Pine. The dominant species grown are Pinus patula, P. taeda, E. grandis and Acacia mearnsii. Revenue is generated from timber exports. Forest fires are the major contributors of significant financial losses in these commercial plantations. Hence this article examines the causes of these fires and possible strategies for mitigating these anthropogenic fires.

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Carbon farming with bamboos in Africa: A call for action

BACKGROUND

Bamboos are of paramount importance for livelihoods, landscapes, and climate change mitigation. When compared to other regions, little research has been done about bamboo resources in Africa. This is because National Forest Resources Assessments rarely capture the necessary data. Approximately, there are 38 species of woody bamboos native to sub-Saharan Africa including Madagascar with many endemic species. So far, their population is dwindling but if sustainably managed, they can contribute significantly economically and to the environment.

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Safety Nets, Gap Filling and Forests: A Global-Comparative Perspective

BACKGROUND

This paper seeks to prove how forests and wildlands are utilized in developing countries as safety nets to shocks, and how they provide resources for seasonal gap filling. The study was carried out in various developing countries in different continents. Areas where there is no forest at all were excluded and those completely forest covered such as those dominated by hunter- gatherers were not considered.

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Impact of Forest Management on Insect Abundance and Damage in a Lowland Tropical Forest in Southern Cameroon

Background

A burgeoning timber industry in Cameroon, which became the fifth largest producer of timber in the world in the 1990’s, led to unsustainably high deforestation rates and high demand for forest regeneration interventions. Research in the Mbalmayo Forest Reserve in southern Cameroon has compared different silvicultural techniques for forest regeneration including complete and partial clearance methods.

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Fuelwood collection and its impacts on a protected tropical mountain forest in Uganda.

Background

This study examined the patterns, effects and potential management of fuelwood extraction on the forest of Mt Elgon, located in the Eastern part of Uganda, Sub- Saharan Africa. Fuelwood is the main source of energy, mainly collected from the forest. 98% of the households use fuelwood and charcoal for cooking and heating. This is a protected area with a history of conflict between surrounding populations and conservation actors. No other forest remains in its direct vicinity.

Research goals and Methods

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Floristic composition, structure and natural regeneration in a moist semideciduous forest following anthropogenic disturbances and plant invasion

Background

This research examined the floristic composition, struture and natural regeneration in three different forests: undisturbed (UF), disturbed-invaded (DIF) and disturbed (DF) within a forest reserve in Ghana.

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Targeted habitat restoration can reduce extinction rates in fragmented forests

Background

Habitat lost is one of the primary drivers of species extinction. This study examines two highly-fractured ecosystems, the Eastern Arc Mountains of Tanzania and the Atlantic Forest of Brazil, and evaluates the rate at which habitat loss may lead to extinction and thus biodiversity loss. Specifically, the authors use halflife vs. area relationship to determine how long it will take to lose one-half of all tropical bird communities in each habitat. 

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Restoration of Ecosystem Carbon Stocks following Exclosure Establisment in Communal Grazing Lands in Tigray, Ethiopia

Background

The study examines changes in ecosystem Carbon stocks (ECS) after the establishment of exclosures on communal grazing lands.  Exclosures are areas where livestock are prohibited from grazing. 

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Sprouting, succession and tree species diversity in a South African coastal dune forest

Background

This study examines the role of sprouting in the maintenance of plant diversity where prevailing disturbance frequency and severity allows, specifically, in the coastal dune forest of Kwazulu-Natal. 

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