East Asia and Pacific

Landscape Rehabilitation of Degraded Tropical Forest Ecosystems: Case Study of the CIFOR/Japan Project in Indonesia and Peru

background

The CIFOR/Japan project on tropical forest restoration involves three principal components: 1) evaluation of logging impacts on forest systems, 2) development of methods for the restoration of logged and degraded forests, and 3) development of silvicultural practices for degraded forests.

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Rehabilitation of Tropical Rainforests Based on Indigenous Species for Degraded Areas in Sarawak, Malaysia

background

This study describes the success of native species planted in areas of abandoned shifting cultivation in Sarawak, Malaysia.

Research Goals & Methods

Site contitions in which species were planted included:  open conditions, including severely eroded and compacted areas and man-made mounds, and shady conditions. Growth and survival was recorded for 60-72 months, depending on the site

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Rehabilitation of Degraded Forest with Shorea leprosula and S. selanica Cuttings

background

This article describes limits to dipterocarp-based reforestation due to irregular flowering pattern, short seed storage period, and uncertain planting techniques in Southeast Asia. In West Java, Indonesia, the authors test the effectiveness of vegetative propagation for two species of fast-growing dipterocarps: Shorea leprosula and Shorea selanica.

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Growth Increments of Indigenous Species Planted in Secondary Forest Area

Background

Appropriate species selection for reforestation of degraded lands in the tropics makes a great difference in survival rates and success in establishing secondary forest. Indigenous species used in reforestation are not always able to survive in their native landscapes based on the degree of site degradation. This paper reports on growth increments of five tree species indigenous to Malaysia five years after planting.

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Variability and Grouping of Leaf Traits in Multi-Species Reforestation (Leyte, Philippines)

background

Research on functional diversity is an important part in ongoing efforts to identify appropriate native tree species for reforestation projects. Increasing understanding of easy to measure physiological characteristics, such as specific leaf area, can help predict a variety of functional characteristics as well as growth perfromance.

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Forest Plantations on Imperata Grasslands in Indonesia: Establishment, Silviculture, and Utilization Potential

background

This dissertation presents results from multiple studies of reforestation on areas dominated by Imperata cylindrica grass in South Kalimantan, Indonesia.

Research Goals & Methods

The author evaluated tree species selection, intra-specific provenance selection, site preparation, fertilization, and ground vegetation under plantations.

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Seed Dispersal by Birds and Bats in Lowland Philippine Forest Successional Area

Background

While seed dispersal by birds and bats can be an important driver of succession, few studies have studied this dynamic in the tropical forests of SE Asia. This study compares the role of bird and bat dispersal in the lowland dipterocarp forest of the Subic Watershed Forest Reserve (SWFR) in Luzon Island, Philippines.

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Trees Commonly Cultivated in Southeast Asia: An Illustrated Field Guide

background 

This manual is an identification guide for the commonly-encountered trees of Southeast Asia. It provides botanical information for conifers, broad-leafed trees, bamboos, palms, and bananas.

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Evaluation of Reforestation Potential of 83 Tree Species Planted on Imperata cylindrica Dominated Grassland – A case Study from South Kalimantan, Indonesia

background

In this study, 83 tree species (native and exotic) were tested for their growth and survival in species selection trials in South Kalimantan, Indonesia.

Research Goals & Methods

The trees were planted between January 1987 and December 1988 in areas dominated by the exotic grass Imperata cylindrica and weeding was conducted twice a year.

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Tree Plantations in the Philippines and Thailand: Economic, Social, and Environmental Evaluation

Background

Tropical land area under plantations have dramatically increased in recent decades, largely as a result of natural forest depletion. Forest plantations cannot qualitatively substitute the timber or the habitat of natural forests, yet are growing in global importance both commercially and ecologically. However, the negative and positive social and environmental impacts must also be included in analysis of tropical forest plantations.

Open access copy available
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