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Restoring tropical forests on lands mined for bauxite: Examples from the Brazilian Amazon

Background:

Effective forest restoration is required to avoid the adverse environmental impacts of mining. However, restorationists working in most tropical regions lack the requisite knowledge of species selection and disturbance ecology to aid in mimicking the pre-disturbed ecosystem.  One noteworthy exception to this is the forest restoration initiative created by a Brazilian bauxite mining company operating at Trombetas in Pará State, central Amazonia, since the early 1980s.

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Developing a framework for sustainable development indicators for the mining and minerals industry

BACKGROUND:

Minerals are essential to a variety of industries that help in everyday life. However, the extraction of minerals is often associated with numerous negative environmental impacts. The mining industry is responsible for more pressing sustainability challenges than any other industry. The mining industry must address these challenges by addressing the concerns of different stakeholders, as demonstrated by the Mining, Minerals and Sustainable Development project.

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Ecological filtering shapes the impacts of agricultural deforestation on biodiversity

Background:

Deforestation for agriculture poses a significant threat to biodiversity. However, the severity of these impacts varies in agricultural landscapes. This study emphasizes the need to understand the factors underlying this variation to predict future biodiversity impacts of agricultural land use. While previous studies focused on landscape features and management regimes, this article introduces the concept of filtering, suggesting that natural and anthropogenic filtering may shape biodiversity responses at large geographical scales

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The carbon sink of secondary and degraded humid tropical forests

Background:

The Forest and Land use Declaration from the 26th Climate Change Conference of the Parties underscores the crucial role of tropical moist forests  as a nature-based solution to address climate and ecological emergencies. However, the Amazon, Borneo, and Central Africa forests experience ongoing forest cover losses due to various anthropogenic drivers. This has led to a mosaic of recovering forests at different stages post-disturbance, with limited understanding of their impact on forest carbon dynamics. 

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Silvicultural opportunities for increasing carbon stock in restoration of Atlantic forests in Brazil

Background:

The Brazilian Atlantic Forest has suffered significant reduction due to deforestation for urbanization and agriculture expansion. To address this issue, restoration plantations with native tree species have been identified as a promising solution to rebuild the forest habitat and promote carbon sequestration. In particular, high input silviculture, which involves intensive fertilization and weed control similar to those applied in commercial production forest plantations, has been shown to increase productivity and accelerate the forest restoration process.

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Co-benefits in biodiversity conservation and carbon stock during forest regeneration in a preserved tropical landscape

Background:

Recognizing the connection between carbon stock and biodiversity has become more crucial in light of the requirements set by international agreements. Consequently, a vital and indispensable measure for guiding relevant global environmental initiatives is to empirically investigating the potential advantages of restoring degraded areas through forest regeneration. This approach aims to boost both aboveground carbon stock and biodiversity, moving them closer to their natural levels.

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Carbon sequestration and nutrient cycling in agroforestry systems on degraded soils of Eastern Amazon, Brazil

Background:

Among various approaches to forest restoration, passive restoration via natural regeneration stands out as the most cost-efective option. However, the resilience of the forest is heavily influenced by factors such as water availability, soil integrity, and the presence of seed dispersers in the landscape. In situations where resilience is low, successful restoration relies on active human interventions. Unfortunately, many restoration projects, especially those involving smallholders, face budget constraints. In such circumstances, Agroforestry Systems emerge as a restoration strategy that combines both socio-economic and ecological advantages.

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Restoring soil carbon and chemical properties through silvopastoral adoption in the Colombian Amazon region

Background:

The traditional livestock production in this region causes the loss of forest areas each year, leading to soil degradation and loss of biodiversity. Silvopastoral systems have become an attractive alternative with positive effects for the environment, society, and the regional economy. The study was conducted in two counties in the northwestern Colombian Amazon, which are representative of the hilly landscape typical for Silvopastoral systems implementation. 

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Agroforestry systems recover tree carbon stock faster than natural succession in Eastern Amazon, Brazil

Background:

Under the global context of climate change mitigation and adaptation, forests and land use practices in carbon sequestration and ecosystem resilience in the Amazon regions is of critical importance. Understanding the effectiveness of agroforestry systems in recovering tree carbon stock contributes to the broader discourse on sustainable land management, biodiversity conservation, and climate change mitigation strategies. Therefore, this study aims to address the gaps in knowledge regarding the carbon recovery potential of agroforestry systems and their role in sustainable land use in the Amazon region.

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Active restoration accelerates the carbon recovery of human-modified tropical forests

Background:

More than half of all tropical forests are degraded by human impacts, leaving them threatened with conversion to agricultural plantations and risking substantial biodiversity and carbon losses. Restoration could accelerate recovery of aboveground carbon density (ACD), but adoption of restoration is constrained by cost and uncertainties over effectiveness. Therefore, is necessary to  understand the economic feasibility of restoration treatments in the context of global carbon pricing and the Paris climate agreement.

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