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Carbon loss and removal due to forest disturbance and regeneration in the Amazon

Background:

Deforestation and forest degradation urges scientists to understand the dynamics of carbon loss and removal in the Amazon, particularly due to significant role of the Amazon rainforest in the global carbon cycle and the potential implications for climate change. By addressing this topic, the study aims to enhance our understanding of the Amazon's role in the global carbon cycle, provide insights into the spatial and temporal patterns of carbon loss and removal, and contribute valuable information for informing climate change mitigation strategies and tropical forest conservation efforts.

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Discolouring the Amazon Rainforest: how deforestation is affecting butterfly coloration

Background

Butterflies are among the most colorful organisms in the world, and color plays a central role in many of their life-history strategies. However, sudden environmental changes, including anthropogenic disturbances such as habitat loss and fragmentation, could affect the efficacy of coloration strategies in these and other animals. Therefore, this study aims to investigate how deforestation is affecting butterfly coloration in the Amazon Rainforest and to provide insights into the potential consequences of anthropogenic disturbances on these beautiful creatures.

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Do primary rainforest tree species recruit into passively and actively restored tropical rainforest?

Background

In many restoration projects, recruitment is dominated by a low diversity of regionally-abundant pioneer species and species with small, easily dispersed seeds. These species are characteristic of secondary rainforest and do not include the far more diverse suite of species characteristic of the original, primary rainforest. As restoring ecosystem processes is one of the central goals of restoration, this raises the question of which, if any, of the available rainforest restoration methods may be used to promote the recruitment of primary rainforest species.

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The effect of ecological restoration methods on carbon stocks in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest

Background

There is a critical need for effective ecological restoration strategies in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest, one of the most threatened biodiversity hotspots globally, with extensive areas degraded due to human activities such as deforestation and land use change. Especifically, to understanding how different restoration methods impact carbon sequestration in this ecosystem and promote the recovery of this vital ecosystem. 

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Direct seeded and colonizing species guarantee successful early restoration of South Amazon forests

Background

South Amazon forests have been highly deforested, including the legally protected riparian forests. Direct seeding is a low cost method, easy-to-implement at large scale. The authors emphasize the imperative to reduce the costs and enhance the outcomes of restoration efforts, which have become mainstream solutions in countering biodiversity loss and climate change around the world.

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An overview of forest loss and restoration in the Brazilian Amazon

Background:

The accelerated process of forest loss and degradation in the Brazilian Amazon began in the 1970s due to government-promoted economic development initiatives. This led to significant deforestation, with approximately 20% (780,967 km2) of the region being affected . Nevertheless, the region still lacks scientific studies that reinforce the choice of best practices for forest restoration, and the information currently available is not enough to quantify what has already been recovered or the potential area to be restored.

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Evaluating the success of direct seeding for tropical forest restoration over ten years

Background

The main causes of deforestation in the Amazon are large-scale agriculture and cattle ranching, which have led to the loss of millions of hectares of forest. To address this issue, different mechanisms have been implemented since 2005 to reduce deforestation and increase forest restoration.  However, highly modified, degraded areas with a long history of use may take a long time to regenerate naturally or may not recover into a secondary forest. Therefore, active restoration methods are needed to accomplish this massive obligation.

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Restauración ecológica de bosques tropicales en Costa Rica: efecto de varios modelos en la producción, acumulación y descomposición de hojarasca

Background:

La deforestación altera los ciclos de nutrientes y aumenta la fuga de nutrientes del ecosistema con altos costos ambientales y sociales. No obstante, la deforestación sigue siendo intensa en la mayoría de los países tropicales, especialmente en América Latina, donde los bosques son talados y rápidamente convertidos para la agricultura. Así, las estrategias de restauración en los trópicos son indispensables considerando la gran escala de degradación y la necesidad de mantener procesos ecológicos vitales. 

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Mining in the Amazon: Importance, impacts, and challenges to restore degraded ecosystems. Are we on the right way?

Background:

With mining playing a significant role in the economies of Amazonian countries, there is a growing urgency to understand, mitigate, and restore the degraded ecosystems that result from these mining operations. These tasks present a complex set of challenges, including technological limitations, legal inconsistencies, and a shortage of qualified professionals.

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Forest Health and Global Change

Background:

In addition to facing natural disruptions such as drought, windthrow, insect infestations, diseases, and fires, forests are increasingly grappling with intensified stressors of anthropogenic origin. These stressors arise directly through activities like logging and clearing or indirectly through climate change, air pollution, and invasive species. The pace of these human-induced disturbances surpasses the adaptability of evolutionary processes, thus shaping the future of global forests through intricate responses to multiple stressors spanning local to global scales.

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