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Mainstreaming Native Species-Based Forest Restoration

Background

This publication summarizes the proceedings of a 2010 conference held in the Phillipines titled "Mainstreaming Native Species-Based Forest Restoration", which aimed to provide technical expertise and experience with restoration and reforestation practices for tropical forests in order to address the country's forest cover decline. The report summarizes the events of the two days, including two opening remarks, six presentations, and five panels. 

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Beekeeping of Stingless Bees to Strengthen Community Livelihoods

Background

This publication provides a summary of a training held Central Kalimantan, Indonesia in November 2019 concerning the keeping of stingless bees to enhance local livelihoods. The Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) requires companies to protect, conserve, and restore areas of high conservation value (HCV); one means of achieving this is through providing sustainable livelihoods like beekeeping. Thus this training aims at providing both plantation managers and local community members with the technical skills and knowledge to promote stingless beekeeping in order to preserve biodiversity and promote livelihoods. 

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Experiences with capacity building for ecological restoration in Latin America

Background

Landscape scale restoration initiatives are experiencing an increasing popularity, specifically in Latin America. Yet, these initiatives not only require an ecological understanding but also a holistic focus on the socio-economic. To do so, it is critical to promote capacity building in conjunction with these initiatives. Capacity building both improves the technical skills of stakeholders while also increasing the institutional capacity and leadership of all parties. This paper highlights six organizations who are successfully strengthening capacity for ecological restoration in Latin America. 

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Functional divesity changes during tropical forest succession

Background

This paper evaluates changes in species richness and functional diversity during tropical secondary forest succession following shifting cultivation in Chiapas, Mexico, particularly examining whether speces richness is a good predictor of functional diversity. Functional diversity was calculated based on a combination of nine functional traits, and two individual traits important for primary production (specific leaf area) and carbon sequestration (wood density).

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Anthropogenic disturbance in tropical forests can double biodiversity loss from deforestation

Background

The authors examined the impacts of anthropogenic disturbances within a forest on the ability of the forest to conserve biodiversity and provide ecosytem services. The research used large data sets of plants, birds, and dung beetles and used them as indicators of biodiversity change in the forest.

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Policy Options for the World's Primary Forests in Multilateral Environmental Agreements

Background

Around the world, primary forest continue to decline. The authors of this article recognize that international forest policies is one means to slow or turn around these trends and thus they identify four new actions that can provide a policy foundation for key international negotiations.

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Floristic composition, structure and natural regeneration in a moist semideciduous forest following anthropogenic disturbances and plant invasion

Background

This research examined the floristic composition, struture and natural regeneration in three different forests: undisturbed (UF), disturbed-invaded (DIF) and disturbed (DF) within a forest reserve in Ghana.

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Targeted habitat restoration can reduce extinction rates in fragmented forests

Background

Habitat lost is one of the primary drivers of species extinction. This study examines two highly-fractured ecosystems, the Eastern Arc Mountains of Tanzania and the Atlantic Forest of Brazil, and evaluates the rate at which habitat loss may lead to extinction and thus biodiversity loss. Specifically, the authors use halflife vs. area relationship to determine how long it will take to lose one-half of all tropical bird communities in each habitat. 

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Tropical forest restoration: Fast resilience of plant biomass contrasts with slow recovery of stable soil C stocks

Background

The study looks at three land-use types: 1) land left barren after a clear-cut in the 1950s, with only a sparse cover of shrubs, grasses, and vines, 2) a Eucalyptus exserta plantation established in the 1960s, and 3) a eucalyptus plantation that was clear-cut in 1974 and converted into a plantation of native tree species, now considered a secondary forest. The biomass and soil carbon (C) of these three land-use types were compared to a nearby natural old-growth forest.

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Tropical Montane Forest Restoration in Costa Rica: Overcoming Bariers to Dispersal and Establishment

Background

The article addressed different types of environmental and ecological factors limiting forest regeneration on a tropical montane abandoned pasture in Costa Rica, and the subsequent forest restoration strategies that could be feasible.  The authors sought to answer the following questions: 1) What factors limit tropical forest recovery in abandoned pasture? and (2) How can we use this information to design strategies to facilitate ecosystem recovery?

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