Tropical Dry Forest

Between and Within-Site Comparisons of Structural and Physiological Characteristics and Foliar Nutrient Content of 14 Tree Species at a Wet, Fertile Site and a Dry, Infertile Site in Panama

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This study seeks to analyze how stress resulting from different amounts of precipitation and soil nutrients affects tree growth. The study hypothesized that tree structure and physiology as well as foliar nutrient content would be significantly different between the sites, and trees at the wet, fertile sites would perform better. Secondly, the study hypothesized finding a greater variability of integrated tree growth at the drier site, as plant stress is expected to accentuate differences in performance. Lastly, it was hypothesized that leaf mass area and foliar N would predict photosynthetic capacity.

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Biomass Distribution Among Tropical Tree Species Grown Under Differing Regional Climates

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This study presents results from species selection trials in Panama as part of the PRORENA project, which examined the most effective species and methods for Panamanian government-supported reforestation projects.

research goal & methods

In 2003, 16 native and 2 exotic species were planted in single-species plots with a 3m x 3m spacing of trees at two different sites (one seasonally wet, one more dry). All plots were thinned to 50% of their original density at two years after plantation establishment, and the thinned trees were measured for biomass and biomass partitioning.

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Growth, carbon sequestration, and management of native tree plantations in humid regions of Costa Rica

Background

The Costa Rican government has provided incentives for reforestation programs since 1986 and initiated a Payment for Environmental Services program in 1996. These incentives yielded native species reforestation programs throughout the country. This study examines growth, carbon sequestration, and management of seven native tree species (Vochysia guatemalensis, Vochysia ferruginea, Hyeronima alchorneoides, Calophyllum brasiliense, Terminalia amazonia, Virola koschnyi, and Dipteryx panamensis) in single-species plantations managed by small landowners.

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Evaluation of 15 Indigenous and Introduced Species for Reforestation and Agroforestry in Northeastern Mexico

Background

This article presents the results of a reforestation study in the Sierra Madre Mexico.

Research Goals & Methods

Ten native species (Pithecellobium, Prosopis, Helietta, Cordia, and Acacia spp.) and five exotic species (Leucaena and Eucalyptus spp.) were raised in a nursery and planted in June of 1984. Measurements took place between 1985 and 1999.

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Cloning of erect, thornless, non-browsed nitrogen fixing trees of Haiti's principal fuelwood species (Prosopis juliflora)

Background

Prosopis juliflora (bayawon in Creole) is a spiny leguminous tree that is used throughout arid regions of Africa, Asia, and the Caribbean for fuelwood and fodder.  Due to its genetic diversity, pod protein and carbohydrate content varies widely, suggesting advantages of clonal reproduction. This Haiti-based study tests exotic and native varieties of Prosopis for growth rates.

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Restoring rainforest fragments: Survival of mixed-native species seedlings under contrasting site conditions in the Western Ghats, India

Background

Historical fragmentation and a current annual deforestation rate of 1.2% in the Western Ghats biodiversity hotspot have resulted in a human-dominated landscape of plantations, agriculture, and developed areas, with embedded rainforest fragments that form biodiversity refuges and animal corridors. This study evaluates restoration efficacy for tropical rainforest under three different site conditions in the Anamalai hills, India.

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An Evaluation of Farmers' Experiences Planting Native Trees in Rural Panama: Implications for Reforestation with Native Species in Agricultural Landscapes

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The Panamanian government has created reforestation incentive programs to encourage farmers to plant trees in order to restore ecosystem services to degraded lands. However, many farmers and landowners choose not to participate in these programs. Additionally, many such incentive programs result in large plantations of non-native species. In 2001, the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute created a native species reforestation project known as PRORENA (Proyecto de Reforestación con Especias Nativas) to study strategies for successful native species reforestation in a social, economic, and scientific context.

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