Tropical Wet Forest

Forest plantations and climate change discourses: New powers of ‘green’ grabbing in Cambodia

Background

Forestry-based emissions reduction programs are increasingly being presented as a solution to climate change. Technical experts argue that keeping existing forests standing and creating new forests can help remove carbon emissions. However, several researchers point to a gap between the stated objectives of these programs and their biophysical and unintended socioeconomic outcomes. For example, some negative socioeconomic outcomes may include the displacement of local communities or the loss of customary common land. This paper studies the socioeconomic impacts of Cambodia’s first large scale reforestation project for climate change mitigation.

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Devolution of forest rights and sustainable forest management (Volume 1): A review of policies and programs in 16 developing countries

Background

A significant amount of global forest area is publicly owned and managed, but in recent years several governments have implemented or proposed policies to devolve rights to forest-based communities. This paper examines the policies and practices that are related to the devolution of forest management in 16 countries across Africa, Asia, and Latin America.

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Tenure rights and access to forests: A training manual for research, Part I. A guide to key issues

Background

This training manual outlines major contemporary issues surrounding forest tenure rights, and provides guidance on how to incorporate information about tenure into research. While there is a significant amount of research on tenure rights, the author assets that, it is important to revisit this work since tenure rights to forests are changing. There are mutliple processes underway, leading to seemingly more rights for people who live in forests as well as a greater privatization of forests. Understanding tenure rights is also critical given increased land-grabbing for purposes ranging from climate change mitigation to conservation.

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Beyond tenure: Rights-based approaches to peoples and forests, some lessons from the Forest Peoples Programme

Background

Land tenure reforms have been implemented in several forested landscapes to support livelihood security among forest-depended communities. However, while these reforms have led to some improvements in tenure and livelihood security, they have also increased social exclusion and marginalization in some contexts. This paper argues that tenure reforms should be implemented within a rights-based framework, but one that integrates a range of human rights and is not solely focused on property rights.  

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Our land, our life: A participatory assessment of the land tenure situation of the Indigenous peoples in Guyana. Report for Region 8

Background

From 1995 onwards, the government of Guyana began to address undecided Amerindian claims by demarcating land in villages where titles had already been granted, granting title extensions, and grant new titles. This report outlines the findings and recommendations of a participatory assessment of land tenure security among indigenous people in present-day northwestern Guyana.

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Context in land matters: The effects of history on land formalizations

Background

Land formalization is the process by which governments grant legal rights to land, along with responsibilities and conditions of access through land titles and other official documents. This process typically establishes or re-establishes the authority of the state over the governance of land. This paper draws on examples from Africa and Asia to illustrate how land formalization has differing impacts on a diverse set of claimants, and largely increases inequity.

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The contributions of Indigenous Peoples and local communities to ecological restoration

Background

Indigenous Peoples and local communities often rely on their local environment to meet their basic needs, and so are affected by global environmental change. They also contribute to ecological restoration through supporting species selection and providing information on the historical state of the ecosystem. However, the authors point out that involving IPLCs does not always lead to improve restoration outcomes. They outline strategies to integrate indigenous and local knowledge into programs to improve restoration outcomes.

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Could 2021–2030 be the decade to couple new human values with ecological restoration? Valuable insights and actions are emerging from the Colombian Amazon

BACKGROUND

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Restoring forests as a means to many ends

BACKGROUND

The earth is nearly reaching environmental thresholds which can result in devastating effects of climate change and biodiversity loss. Failure to take action can lead to disruptions of ecosystems, economies, and the society. Protecting and restoring native ecosystems is needed, however, changes in forest cover have not been well understood. Also, the knowledge of where and how to focus such restoration efforts is still limited.

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Environment and landscape rather than planting design are the drivers of success in long‐term restoration of riparian Atlantic forest

Introduction

While identifying factors that contribute to restoration is difficult, it is ultimately critical in order to ensure the long-term sustainability and resilience of the restored landscape.

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