General

The contributions of Indigenous Peoples and local communities to ecological restoration

Background

Indigenous Peoples and local communities often rely on their local environment to meet their basic needs, and so are affected by global environmental change. They also contribute to ecological restoration through supporting species selection and providing information on the historical state of the ecosystem. However, the authors point out that involving IPLCs does not always lead to improve restoration outcomes. They outline strategies to integrate indigenous and local knowledge into programs to improve restoration outcomes.

Available with subscription or purchase

Potential impacts of COVID-19 on tropical forest recovery

BACKGROUND

Ecosystem Restoration is one of the goals of several organizations including the UN.  COVID-19 pandemic has brought uncertainties in achieving these goals as focus has shifted to the health sector and rebuilding the economy. Two, UN critical meetings have been delayed; platforms for governments to publicly participate in tracking restoration progress and making new commitments. Other environmental changes have also been noted including wildlife’s response to the sudden absence of humans and improved air quality in many major cities. 

Open access copy available

Towards food security and improved nutrition: increasing the contribution of forests and trees

BACKGROUND

This Policy brief is a product of a knowledge and information sharing between Biodiversity International, World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF), and the World Bank. This was designed for policymakers on two vital areas: what they need to know; and what they need to do.

It also provides different case studies on various interventions towards ensuring food security and access to improved nutrition.

Open access copy available

The Evolution of International Policy on REDD+

BACKGROUND

The article traces the background and history of REDD+ starting from gaps identified in the Clean Development Mechanism of the Kyoto Protocol (i.e. the lack of projects to reduce emissions due to deforestation in developing countries), to the early beginning of RED or reduced emissions from deforestation, and finally to its evolution as embedded in the Paris Agreement of 2015 as REDD+ (Article 5).

Available with subscription or purchase

Reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+): game changer or just another quick fix?

BACKGROUND

The article provides an extensive review of Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+) in terms of its promise of multiple co-benefits as well as the various challenges it faces in its implementation. It features the Norway-Indonesia REDD+ as the most recent case study and examines whether it holds true to its name as a breakthrough mechanism in reducing Greenhouse Gas (GHG) build-up in the atmosphere primarily due to the unabated carbon emissions and tropical deforestation.

Available with subscription or purchase

Adopt a carbon tax to protect tropical forests

Background

The authors states that the halting of deforestation is critical to addressing climate change and biodiversity loss, the investment in conservation is lacking. Thus, they call upon countries through out the tropics to adopt a carbon tax, which would serve as a disincentive for companies to continue deforestation.

Open access copy available

Money for Nothing? A Call for Empirical Evaluation of Biodiversity Conservation Investments

Background

The authors assert that while the ecological aspects of conservation efforts are highly investigated and supported by empirical evidence, the policy aspects are not. In response, they argue that conservation policy measures must adopt program evaluation methods that would allow one to determine if intervention would be viable. 

Open access copy available

Have integrated landscape approaches reconciled societal and environmental issues in the tropics?

Background

The author cite that while there has been growing recognition of intergrated landscape approaches, which aims to enhance environmental and social outcomes, there is still a lack of understanding. There has been suggestions that these approaches have been undertherorized and a lack of evidence of its effectiveness.

Open access copy available

Revisiting IPCC Tier 1 coefficients for soil organic and biomass carbon storage in agroforestry systems

Introduction

While agroforestry systems cover a signifcant amount of land worldwide and have the capacity to sequester large amounts of carbon, they are often not considered in climate change mitigation. Most importantly, the IPCCC does not recognize them in carbon accounting primarily because there is so much diversity in the systems. 

Open access copy available

Beyond the species pool: modification of species dispersal, establishment, and assembly by habitat restoration

Introduction

This article asserts that understanding the forces that shape species composition in plant communities, including seed dispersal, establishment, and assembly, is critical to restoration. Serving as an introduction to a special issue on seed dispersal and soil seed banks, the article reviews five major themes in relation to the process of species composition of plants. 

Open access copy available
Subscribe to General