Funding

Formations boisées et savanes africaines: opportunités et potentialités de la REDD+ (Wooded formations and African savannas: opportunities and potential of REDD+)

The authors provide an overview of the REDD+ program and deforestation in Africa. They addressed limitations fo REDD+ and noted that because each community is different, each project must be tailored to the individual needs of communities.

 

Open access copy available

Fonds Environnementaux et Paiement Pour Les Services Ecosystemiques (Environmental Funds and Payments for Ecosystem Services)

The authors discuss environmental funds and the possibility of using payments for ecosystem services towards conservation efforts. They provided several case studies to demonstrate different systems of payments for ecosystem services and gave recommendations.

 

Open access copy available

Les forêts plantées dans les économies émergentes: Bonnes pratiques pour des investissements durables et responsables (The forests planted in emerging economies: Best practices for sustainable and responsible investments)

The authors provide a summary of best practices regarding sustainable and responsible investments in forests.

 

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The Potential of REDD+ in Supporting the Transition to a Green Economy in the Congo Basin

Background

The authors investigate the use of REDD+ as a means of transitioning to a green economy, using the countries of the Congo Basin region as case studies. To do so, the authors complete a review and analysis of national REDD+ strategies and REDD+ readiness proposals submitted to the Forest Carbon Partnership Facility. 

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Scaling Up Farmer-Managed Natural Regeneration in Africa to Restore Degraded Landscapes

Background

Protecting and managing natural regeneration of woody species on‐farm  can help create new agroforestry parklands as well as promote natural regeneration off‐farm. Increasing the number of trees on farms as well as off‐farm is important in the context of accelerated climate change and ambitious pledges to restore degraded forestland. This study examines large-scale agroforestry parklands in three African countries.

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Economic and Social Significance of Forests for Africa’s Sustainable Development

background

This magazine issue covers topics related to Africa's forests and sustainable development.

Conclusions & Takeaways

Topics include sustainable mangrove management in Nigeria, plantation forests in South Africa, natural resource management in Zambia, land governance by local communities, etc.

 

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Mangrove reforestation: greening or grabbing coastal zones and deltas? Case studies in Senegal.

Background

Mangroves have lost 20% of their global extent over the last 20 years. Mangrove reforestation incentives are increasingly widespread as a response to restore this vital ecosystem. However, the social and ecological impacts of common mangrove plantation methods are not adequately understood.

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Financial Governance and Indonesia’s Reforestation Fund during the Soeharto and Post-Soeharto Periods, 1989–2009: A Political Economic Analysis of Lessons for REDD+

Background

In this occassional paper, CIFOR notes how Indonesia is in an unique position to utilize the REDD+ initiative to increase revenue and reduce loss of forest cover, overall contributing to the reduction in global carbon emmssions. In order to offer lessons for the future, this paper examines the financial management and government practices of the country's Reforestation Fund over the past two decades.

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National Forest Policy of Malawi

Background

In Malawi, there has been extensive forest degradation, estimated at an annual loss of 2.8%. The degradation is caused by a variety of factors, including agriculture expansion, human settlement, fire use, timber and non-timber over extraction. The 2016 Forest Policy of Malawi outlines a policy-approach to stop and revert these trends. 

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Land Degradation, Less Favored Lands and the Rural Poor: A Spatial and Economic Analysis.

Background

Previous studies have examined the differing economic consequences of land degradation for various groups of people, finding that the rural poor of less developed countries rely on some of the most marginal, degraded land. Yet, these studes seignificantly differ in their use of key spatial land and population indicators and the spatially referenced data generated are inadequate for cross-country economic analysis of the impact of land degradation on global poverty. This study aims to rectify these shortcomings. 

Open access copy available
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