Gender

Livelihoods diversification and gender in Malawi

BACKGROUND

More than 50% of the population of Malawi lives in rural areas, in extreme poverty. Women and men have significantly different roles in the making of livelihoods. The country’s economy is based on agriculture which is vulnerable to many shocks, forcing the people to diversify to other economic activities. Male headed and female headed homes respond differently to these shocks. Malawi’s gender policy is aiming at reducing the current gender of disparities.

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Leaders in Action: Success Stories from the Tropics

Background

The Environmental Leadership and Training Initiative (ELTI) seeks to seeks to train and support people to restore and conserve tropical forest landscapes. Since 2006, the organizations has engaged with thousands of people both through their in-person and online training platforms and through follow-up support and mentorship. This paper highlights select inspirational stories from ELTI alum. These stories come from the Neotropics, including Panama, Colombia, and Brazil, and Asia, including Indonesia, Singapore, and the Phillipines.  

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Gender Inequality in Malidino Biodiversity Community-based Reserve, Senegal: Political Parties and the 'Village Approach'

Background

This research examines some of the less visible, and ongoing social dynamics in a World Bank-funded conservation site in central Senegal. The goal of the World Bank project was to create a decentralized and community-based participatory forest management program that would re-structure the political economy of the charcoal industry, give more rights and autonomy to the local community, emphasize improved gender equity, and provide technical assistance to NGOs and community-based organizations.

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Strategies for empowering the local people to participate in forest restoration

Background

This study examined how local people’s involvement in determining and establishing appropriate reforestation techniques and practices can yield positive results. The study also examined the conditions for local people’s willingness to participate in implementing such techniques in their practices. The study was conducted in 10 villages surrounding Mabira Forest Reserve located in Central Uganda.

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In Equal Measure: A User Guide to Gender Analysis in Agroforestry

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This guide provides tools for  practioners working with rural communities in tropical countries. It describes how gender roles and responsibiities play a significant role in adoption and development of agroforestry systems.

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Assuming Women’s Representation in Carbon Forestry Projects

Background

Women have historically played a critical role around the world in forest-related decision making yet there has been a significant unequal representation of this stakeholder group when it comes to the recent explosion of carbon-trading interventions, such as payment for ecosystem services (PES) schemes, clean development mechanisms (CDM), and reduced emmissions and deforestation and forst degradation (REDD+). This unequal representation has been widely recognized and there is a fear that it is getting worse as forest governance changes. 

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Addressing Forest Degradation and Timber Deficits in Ghana

background

This report combines the efforts of several studies to present suggestions for best practices in Ghanaian tree plantation systems in the context of the country’s 1996 Forest Development Master Plan, which aimed to reforest 10,000 hectares per year for 20 years. Both public and private plantation systems are discussed, including the country’s Modified Taungya System (MTS)which encourages small-scale plantations. The report presents information on planting schemes, policies, stakeholders, and worker income. 

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On the Restoration of High Diversity Forests: 30 years of Experience in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest

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This review evaluates the restoration of Brazil's Atlantic forest by drawing from published and unpublished sources. Reforestation in Atlantic Brazil took place in phases: government-sponsored plantations predominated until 1982; a focus on native species plantations from 1982-1985; higher diversity of species used from 1985 to 2000; a focus on restoring process rather than copying the structure of natural forests from 2000-2003; and finally a conscious effort to improve intraspecific genetic diversity and seed acquisition from 2003 to today.

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