Economic incentives

Potential for low-cost carbon removal through tropical reforestation

background

The UNFCCC COP21 (UN Framework Convention on Climate Change Conference of the Parties) created the Paris Agreement in 2015, which pledges to “limit global warming to well below 2, preferably 1.5 °C.” For this to happen, we must both reduce how much carbon dioxide (CO2) that is released and find ways to capture CO2 that is already in the atmosphere. This study explores two ways this might happen using Nature-based Solutions: tree planting in the form of reforestation and afforestation, and the prevention of deforestation. 

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Adopt a carbon tax to protect tropical forests

Background

The authors states that the halting of deforestation is critical to addressing climate change and biodiversity loss, the investment in conservation is lacking. Thus, they call upon countries through out the tropics to adopt a carbon tax, which would serve as a disincentive for companies to continue deforestation.

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Can short-term payments for ecosystem services deliver long-term tree cover change?

Background

While payment for ecosystem services (PES) has been lauded has been an effective strategy, particularly to increase tree cover in agricultural areas. Yet, there has been limited evaluation of long-term success, such as that after the payment period.

Goals & Methods

To determine the the long-term effectiveness of PES, the author compares tree cover before and after 13 years of a PES project that promoted silvopastoral systems in Colombia, which was quantified via satellite images.

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The political economy of reforestation and forest restoration in Asia–Pacific: Critical issues for REDD+

Background

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The effects of The International Smallgroup and Tree Planting Program on household income in Nyeri district, Kenya

Background

The aim of the study was to determine the effects of TIST program on household income, environmental services and to determine factors that influence participation. 

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Socio-Economic Indicators for Forest Restoration Projects

Background

This study develops model for assessing the socio-economic outcomes of forest restoration projects. The authors first identifies core social and economic indicators being monitored during and after forest restoration activities; devise a robust and agile model for assessing socio-economic outcomes at different levels of restoration project objectives and resource availability; develop practical and scientific approach and model; and to refine the metric and model for use by the New Mexico’s federally-funded Collaborative Forest Restoration Program (CFRP).

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Land use transitions: Socio-ecological feedback versus socio-economic change

Background

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What drives the success of reforestation projects in tropical developing countries? The case of the Philippines

Background

This study reviewed cases and literatures to assess drivers that ultimately lead restoration projects to have successful outcomes. The main 4 categories of drivers are: technical/biophysical drivers, socio-economic drivers, institutional, policy and management drivers, and reforestation project characteristics. The major indicator of success are fall into two categories: environmental indicators and socio-economic indicators.

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Forestry‐based carbon sequestration projects in Africa: Potential benefits and challenges

Background

While there is growing international interest in developing payment schemes for environmental services, including forest-based carbon sequestration, concern has been expressed that these initiatives are unequally distributed around the globe with an emphasis on Asia or Latin America leaving out African countries where financial inflows could make an especially significant impact given many are among the poorest in the world. This paper seeks to fill a gap in the literature by synthesizing forest-based carbon sequestration projects in Africa while considering the potential to locate future projects there.

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Increasing local capacities in rural Panama

Background 

While Panama continues to have high levels of biodiversity, the country loss large swaths of forest between 1950 to 2000 primarily due to the expansion and intensification of cattle ranching. Drawing from their work with local ranchers, the authors review the emergence of cattle ranching in Panama along with potential solutions and unique approaches to halting these trends.

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