Secondary & Degraded Forest Restoration

The potential of secondary forests to restore biodiversity of the lost forests in semi-deciduous West Africa

BACKGROUND:

The human population in West Africa has increased considerably over the past four decades, leading to a high demand for food. This has led to the conversion of vast forest lands to agricultural lands in the region. Degraded forest landscapes have the capacity to regain fertility and naturally regenerate, resulting in the widespread spread of secondary forests in West Africa. Despite the significant presence of secondary forests in the region, there is rare knowledge about forest successional stages and general dynamics.

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Carbon sequestration and biodiversity following 18 years of active tropical forest restoration

BACKGROUND:

Vast tropical forests have been degraded and converted to other land uses such as agriculture. Degraded forests can regenerate naturally to improve biodiversity and carbon sequestration. However, major degradation factors, such as wildfires, hinder natural regeneration. Forest restoration can play an essential role in such circumstances. Nonetheless, research on methods to increase carbon storage and improve the ecosystem function of tropical forests is limited.

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The carbon sink of secondary and degraded humid tropical forests

Background:

The Forest and Land use Declaration from the 26th Climate Change Conference of the Parties underscores the crucial role of tropical moist forests  as a nature-based solution to address climate and ecological emergencies. However, the Amazon, Borneo, and Central Africa forests experience ongoing forest cover losses due to various anthropogenic drivers. This has led to a mosaic of recovering forests at different stages post-disturbance, with limited understanding of their impact on forest carbon dynamics. 

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Large carbon sink potential of secondary forests in the Brazilian Amazon to mitigate climate change

Background:

With the Brazilian Amazon being a region of global significance for its carbon storage potential, there is a growing need to understand the dynamics of secondary forest regrowth and its implications for carbon sequestration. Previous studies have laid the groundwork for understanding the broad-scale patterns of secondary forest regrowth, but there is a need for a more detailed and spatially explicit analysis that considers both environmental and anthropogenic drivers of regrowth. The urgency to address this knowledge gap is further underscored by the commitment to national and international climate targets.

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Do primary rainforest tree species recruit into passively and actively restored tropical rainforest?

Background

In many restoration projects, recruitment is dominated by a low diversity of regionally-abundant pioneer species and species with small, easily dispersed seeds. These species are characteristic of secondary rainforest and do not include the far more diverse suite of species characteristic of the original, primary rainforest. As restoring ecosystem processes is one of the central goals of restoration, this raises the question of which, if any, of the available rainforest restoration methods may be used to promote the recruitment of primary rainforest species.

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Restauración ecológica de bosques tropicales en Costa Rica: efecto de varios modelos en la producción, acumulación y descomposición de hojarasca

Background:

La deforestación altera los ciclos de nutrientes y aumenta la fuga de nutrientes del ecosistema con altos costos ambientales y sociales. No obstante, la deforestación sigue siendo intensa en la mayoría de los países tropicales, especialmente en América Latina, donde los bosques son talados y rápidamente convertidos para la agricultura. Así, las estrategias de restauración en los trópicos son indispensables considerando la gran escala de degradación y la necesidad de mantener procesos ecológicos vitales. 

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Mapping carbon accumulation potential from global natural forest regrowth

Background:

The authors note that previous studies have estimated the potential for carbon sequestration through afforestation and reforestation, but there has been less focus on the potential for natural forest regrowth. They also highlight the need for more accurate estimates of carbon accumulation rates in regrowing natural forests, as well as a better understanding of the factors that influence these rates.

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Patterns and controls on island-wide aboveground biomass accumulation in second-growth forests of Puerto Rico

Background

Secondary or second-growth forests after land abandonment are a valuable contribution to global carbon sinks. Approximately 70% of the world’s tropical forests are secondary growth, so understanding the carbon sequestration rates on a large scale is important. Sequestration rates are controlled by both abiotic and biotic factors in each region.

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Tropical Forest Landscape Restoration in Indonesia: A Review

Background

Indonesia has an exceptionally high amount of biodiversity and endemic species. As the timber industry has grown, deforestation and degradation drive biodiversity loss, air pollution, deteriorating water quality, and greater emissions. Restoration projects and policies are in place to balance ecological health and human livelihood across landscapes like the ones in Indonesia. Restoration projects are particularly complex in Indonesia due to land tenure clarity issues, disorganized institution, and other social aspects. The authors review forested landscape restoration progress in Indonesia and examines inhibiting factors in institution and policy as well as indicators of restoration benefits.

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Post-fire ecological restoration in Latin American forest ecosystems: Insights and lessons from the last two decades

Background

Forests make up a significant portion of the earth’s aboveground biodiversity. Human-caused wildfires are a main driver of forest loss across Latin America and the Caribbean. The authors review literature to understand the causes of fires and strategies of post-fire restoration. They focus their search on more recent literature within the last two decades in order to highlight the most advanced methods. The authors also search for gaps in knowledge or application of fire restoration practices that may be hindering progress.

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