Biodiversity

Multiple successional pathways in human-modified tropical landscapes: new insights from forest succession, forest fragmentation and landscape ecology research

Introduction

With the rise of deforestation, secondary forests and human-modified tropical landscapes (HMTL) have become an important source of ecosystem services yet there is limited knowledge concerning the successional process of these ecosystems. 

Goals & Methods

The goal of this study is to identify the main drivers of successional pathways In HTML and secondary forests at multiple scales. The authors draw on tropical forest succesion, forest fragmentation, and landscape ecology research to achieve this. 

Available with subscription or purchase

Beekeeping of Stingless Bees to Strengthen Community Livelihoods

Background

This publication provides a summary of a training held Central Kalimantan, Indonesia in November 2019 concerning the keeping of stingless bees to enhance local livelihoods. The Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) requires companies to protect, conserve, and restore areas of high conservation value (HCV); one means of achieving this is through providing sustainable livelihoods like beekeeping. Thus this training aims at providing both plantation managers and local community members with the technical skills and knowledge to promote stingless beekeeping in order to preserve biodiversity and promote livelihoods. 

Open access copy available

Functional divesity changes during tropical forest succession

Background

This paper evaluates changes in species richness and functional diversity during tropical secondary forest succession following shifting cultivation in Chiapas, Mexico, particularly examining whether speces richness is a good predictor of functional diversity. Functional diversity was calculated based on a combination of nine functional traits, and two individual traits important for primary production (specific leaf area) and carbon sequestration (wood density).

Open access copy available

Anthropogenic disturbance in tropical forests can double biodiversity loss from deforestation

Background

The authors examined the impacts of anthropogenic disturbances within a forest on the ability of the forest to conserve biodiversity and provide ecosytem services. The research used large data sets of plants, birds, and dung beetles and used them as indicators of biodiversity change in the forest.

Open access copy available

Targeted habitat restoration can reduce extinction rates in fragmented forests

Background

Habitat lost is one of the primary drivers of species extinction. This study examines two highly-fractured ecosystems, the Eastern Arc Mountains of Tanzania and the Atlantic Forest of Brazil, and evaluates the rate at which habitat loss may lead to extinction and thus biodiversity loss. Specifically, the authors use halflife vs. area relationship to determine how long it will take to lose one-half of all tropical bird communities in each habitat. 

Open access copy available

Microhabitats reduce animal’s exposure to climate extremes

Background

The Scheffers et al. (2014) paper discusses the effect of microhabitats and their corresponding microclimates on ectotherm species in a warming macroclimate. 

Available with subscription or purchase

Sprouting, succession and tree species diversity in a South African coastal dune forest

Background

This study examines the role of sprouting in the maintenance of plant diversity where prevailing disturbance frequency and severity allows, specifically, in the coastal dune forest of Kwazulu-Natal. 

Open access copy available

Diversity enhances carbon storage in tropical forests

Background

Tropical forests are extremely important due to the ability to sequester large amounts of carbon and provide habitat for high levels of biodiversity, particularly tree species. Still there is limited understanding of the relationship between biodiversity and carbon. This study seeks to study this relationship and examine the forest attributes and environmental drivers for ecosystem functioning.

Open access copy available

How pervasive is biotic homogenization in human-modified tropical forest landscapes?

Background

Land-cover change and ecosystem degradation often lead to biotic homogenization. Yet, there is knowledge gaps regarding this phenomena, which this study seeks to fill. Solar et al. (2015) monitor the change in biodiversity along a land use gradient ranging from primary forest to severely degraded and human dominated landscapes.

Open access copy available

Reforesting for the climate of tomorrow: Recommendations for strengthening orangutan conservation and climate change resilience in Kutai National Park, Indonesia

Background

Kutai National Park in East Kalimantan, Indonesia has experienced extensive issues with human population expansion and encrouchment, which threatens both the parks immense biodiversity and the critically endangered Bornean Orangutan.  Moreover, due to climate change, the region is also undergoing severe drought conditions. This paper seeks to explore the vulnerability of the park's biodiversity to climate change and present potential strategies to minimize or even prevent the negative impacts. 

Open access copy available
Subscribe to Biodiversity