Climate Change

Afforestation and reforestation programs in South and South East Asia under the Clean Development Mechanism: Trends and development opportunities

Background

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Limited effects of tree planting on forest canopy cover and rural livelihoods in rural India

Background

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Pitfalls of tree planting show why we need people-centered natural climate solutions

Background

Tree planting campaigns are promoted as a solution to climate change, because of the ability of trees to sequester carbon from the atmosphere. However, research from the social and natural sciences suggests that tree plantations could have potentially negative consequences for people and ecosystems. In addition to failing to meet ecological targets, plantations can also lead to land alienation and the loss of livelihoods for communities. This paper discusses misconceptions about tree plantations.

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Oil palm expansion without enclosure: smallholders and environmental narratives

Background

Oil palm expansion has been shown to cause deforestation and reduce land and resource availability for communities located near plantations. It has also been shown to have mixed impacts on local livelihoods. Some studies point to socially different impacts, with small and marginal farmers less likely to benefit from oil palm expansion while others find significant increases in incomes. This paper seeks to understand the factors that make smallholder farmers participate in oil palm expansion, and outline the varied narratives that are used by the proponents of oil palm expansion.

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Inverting the moral economy: the case of land acquisitions for forest plantations in Tanzania

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Carbon colonialism and the new land grab: Plantation forestry in Uganda and its livelihood impact

Background

There has been a global increase in private sector investments towards activities plantations for clean fuel or climate change mitigation that are justified on the basis of their environmentally beneficial outcomes. This paper examines the discourses and mechanisms that enable the greater privatization of land and other resources using green development as a justification.

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Forest plantations and climate change discourses: New powers of ‘green’ grabbing in Cambodia

Background

Forestry-based emissions reduction programs are increasingly being presented as a solution to climate change. Technical experts argue that keeping existing forests standing and creating new forests can help remove carbon emissions. However, several researchers point to a gap between the stated objectives of these programs and their biophysical and unintended socioeconomic outcomes. For example, some negative socioeconomic outcomes may include the displacement of local communities or the loss of customary common land. This paper studies the socioeconomic impacts of Cambodia’s first large scale reforestation project for climate change mitigation.

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Grey areas in green grabbing: subtle and indirect interconnections between climate change politics and land grabs and their implications for research

Background

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The use of Ecosystem-based Adaptation practices by smallholder farmers in Central America

BACKGROUND

Amidst the impacts of climate change in agricultural sector, there is an increasing number of smallholder farmers across the different landscapes of Central America engaged in sustainable, Ecosystem-based Adaptation (EbA) practices

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The Evolution of International Policy on REDD+

BACKGROUND

The article traces the background and history of REDD+ starting from gaps identified in the Clean Development Mechanism of the Kyoto Protocol (i.e. the lack of projects to reduce emissions due to deforestation in developing countries), to the early beginning of RED or reduced emissions from deforestation, and finally to its evolution as embedded in the Paris Agreement of 2015 as REDD+ (Article 5).

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