Climate Change

Mainstreaming Native Species-Based Forest Restoration

Background

This publication summarizes the proceedings of a 2010 conference held in the Phillipines titled "Mainstreaming Native Species-Based Forest Restoration", which aimed to provide technical expertise and experience with restoration and reforestation practices for tropical forests in order to address the country's forest cover decline. The report summarizes the events of the two days, including two opening remarks, six presentations, and five panels. 

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Tropical forest restoration: Fast resilience of plant biomass contrasts with slow recovery of stable soil C stocks

Background

The study looks at three land-use types: 1) land left barren after a clear-cut in the 1950s, with only a sparse cover of shrubs, grasses, and vines, 2) a Eucalyptus exserta plantation established in the 1960s, and 3) a eucalyptus plantation that was clear-cut in 1974 and converted into a plantation of native tree species, now considered a secondary forest. The biomass and soil carbon (C) of these three land-use types were compared to a nearby natural old-growth forest.

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Restoration of Ecosystem Carbon Stocks following Exclosure Establisment in Communal Grazing Lands in Tigray, Ethiopia

Background

The study examines changes in ecosystem Carbon stocks (ECS) after the establishment of exclosures on communal grazing lands.  Exclosures are areas where livestock are prohibited from grazing. 

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Microhabitats reduce animal’s exposure to climate extremes

Background

The Scheffers et al. (2014) paper discusses the effect of microhabitats and their corresponding microclimates on ectotherm species in a warming macroclimate. 

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Diversity enhances carbon storage in tropical forests

Background

Tropical forests are extremely important due to the ability to sequester large amounts of carbon and provide habitat for high levels of biodiversity, particularly tree species. Still there is limited understanding of the relationship between biodiversity and carbon. This study seeks to study this relationship and examine the forest attributes and environmental drivers for ecosystem functioning.

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Advances in remote sensing technology and implications for measuring and monitoring forest carbon stocks 
and change

Background

Using satelite images to monitor forest cover has advanced significantly in the past few decades but it still requires time to move into operation readiness. This article contributes to this progress through discussing how new technologies (i.e. improved satelite images and Lidar) can be used to improve monitoring of above ground carbon estimates. It specifically focusses on using Lidar technology and how moving Lidar devices from moving planes to satelite equipment could improve Carbon stock estimates.

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Monitoring and estimating tropical forest carbon stocks: making REDD a reality

Background

Aboveground carbon is directly impacted by deforestation and degradation, thus it is often the variable of choice in monitoring activities. It is also used to estimate the amount of carbon in other pools. This article reviews methods available to estimate national-level forest carbon stocks in developing countries.

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Satellite Data-Based Phenological Evaluation of the Nationwide Reforestation of South Korea

Background

South Korea's reforestation efforts since the 1950s have been evaluated for changes in biomass, area and growing stock; but little has been done to study the phenology changes (seasonal changes) and photosynthetic activity, which will help in the preparation of new forest management in light of climate change.

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The Contribution of Traditional Agroforestry to Climate Change Adaptation in the Ecuadorian Amazon: The Chakra System

Background

This article explores the amazonian-indigenous "chakra" agroforestry system, and its utility as a forest management practice that sequesters carbon, increases food security, grows valuable timber, and acts as a habitat connectivity. The size of these cultivated areas range from 0.4 - 4ha, and include species such as anioc (Manihot esculenta Crantz), banana (Musa paradisiaca L.), peach palm (Bactris gasipaes Kunth), fine-flavored cacao (Theobroma cacaoL.) and robusta coffee (Coffea canephora Pierre ex A. Froehner), and a variety of medicinals.

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Growing biodiverse carbon-rich forests

Background

Carbon storage and biodiversity has long been viewed as completely separate restoration objectives, resulting in parceling tracts of restoration land for one objective or the other. This study shows that the relationship between plant functional diversity and carbon sequestration rate depends on climate and habitat factors. Knowing this relationship, a restoration site can be managed for both objectives.

Open access copy available
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