Restoration and Management Strategies

Exotic Eucalypts: From Demonized Trees to Allies of Tropical Forest Restoration?

Background:

Timber, being a product in high demand globally, presents a lucrative market opportunity, and restoration efforts could potentially generate income through the targeted extraction of this material. While the incorporation of commercially valuable exotic trees might incentivize farmers to participate in restoration projects, it raises significant ecological concerns among experts.

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Survival and Early Growth of 51 Tropical Tree Species in Areas Degraded by Artisanal Gold Mining in the Peruvian Amazon

Background:

Artisanal and small-scale gold mining has dramatically changed the landscape of tropical ecosystems, completely removing the soil and vegetation and polluting it with mercury disposals. In order to recover these degraded spaces, reforestation projects need to enhance their knowledge of restoration species growth and survival rates under different site conditions, as well as their fertilization needs.

Goals:

The authors of this study aim to (1) test 51 species with potential for ecological restoration and/or forest rehabilitation; (2) assess the potential for biochar amendments for use in reforestation efforts; and (3) explore species performance regarding their contrasting wood density traits.

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Biochar Effects on Two Tropical Tree Species and Its Potential as a Tool for Reforestation

Background:

Although biochar is starting to be recognized as a potential soil fertilizer, most of the current studies are focused on the growth response of herbaceous crops and not on the impacts of biochar on tree development.

Goals:

The authors measure the survival rate, growth, and biomass accumulation of the seedlings of two tropical tree species Terminalia amazonia (“terminalia”) and Guazuma crinita (“bolaina”) under abandoned gold mine conditions: nutrient-poor and sandy soil. The seedlings were tested under six different treatments (three doses of biochar, with and without fertilizer) for six months.

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Protocolo: Mantenimiento y Fertilización de Parcelas de Reforestación

Background:

Como parte del trabajo de investigación que viene desarrollando el Centro de Innovación Científica Amazónica (CINCIA), se ha realizado la instalación de parcelas experimentales de reforestación en áreas degradadas por actividad minera en Madre de Dios.

As part of the research work being carried out by the Center for Amazonian Scientific Innovation (CINCIA), experimental reforestation plots have been installed in areas degraded by mining activity in Madre de Dios.

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Higher Fire Frequency Impaired Woody Species Regeneration in a South-Eastern Amazonian Forest

Background:

The more and more common forest fires in the Amazon rainforest, caused after fire escape from pasture or deforested lands, cause unpredictable changes to the forest structure. Therefore, it is essential to assess the resilience of these ecosystems after being impacted by fire events and the likelihood of maintaining forest tree species and not being replaced by savanna species.

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Lowland Tapirs Facilitate Seed Dispersal in Degraded Amazonian Forests

Background:

During their first decades of growth, secondary tropical forests have the potential to accumulate significative more carbon than old-growth stands. Nevertheless, recovering degraded forests' habitats could be an expensive task to achieve. In this context, natural regeneration processes, such as seed dispersal by herbivorous animals, offer a cost-effective tool to recover degraded forests, although this role remains largely unexplored.

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Restoration of plant-animal interactions in terrestrial ecosystems

Background

Plant-animal interactions are understudied within ecosystem restoration contexts. They are crucial to restoration success, with valuable processes like pollination, seed dispersal, and herbivory. The potential of animal reintroductions in restoration practices is understudied as well. Understanding these interactions is an important piece for future restoration efforts.

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Patterns and controls on island-wide aboveground biomass accumulation in second-growth forests of Puerto Rico

Background

Secondary or second-growth forests after land abandonment are a valuable contribution to global carbon sinks. Approximately 70% of the world’s tropical forests are secondary growth, so understanding the carbon sequestration rates on a large scale is important. Sequestration rates are controlled by both abiotic and biotic factors in each region.

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Aboveground carbon responses to experimental and natural hurricane impacts in a subtropical wet forest in Puerto Rico

Background

Carbon sequestration is a major climate mitigating process. Tropical forests in particular sequester high amounts of carbon, however disturbance events such as storms can alter the ability of forests to sequester more carbon. Hurricanes create forest gaps and increase ground debris which both provide resources that may promote plant recruitment and growth.

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Optimal restoration for pollination services increases forest cover while doubling agricultural profits

Background

In the midst of a global biodiversity crisis and a rapidly expanding food demand, improving agricultural techniques is a high priority. Pollinators are at the forefront of this restoration goal partially due to their rapid decline in population, and also their crucial role in food production. 75% of globally common food depends on pollinators. Though improving agriculture is important, it is also expensive and risky for land owners. A framework is needed to determine best arrangements and practices for sustainable agriculture.

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