Restoration and Management Strategies

Canopy development in tropical tree plantations: a comparison of species mixtures and monocultures

Background

The establishment of plantation monocultures has dominated much of the intensive forest management practiced in the humid tropics of the Americas, with most forestry research and practice concentrating on a small number of non-indigenous species. Growing interest exists in modifying these practices both by creating mixed-species plantations and by making greater use of native tree species.

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Experimental Tree Assemblages on the Ecological Rehabilitation of a Cloud Forest in Veracruz, Mexico

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This research evaluates the survival of 10 native tree species planted in a heavily degraded montane forest in Veracruz, Mexico.

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Is Tree Diversity an Important Driver for Phosphorus and Nitrogen Acquisition of a Young Tropical Plantation?

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This article presents the effect of native species diversity on the nitrogen and phosphorous pools above-ground in a plantation in the Canal Zone of Panama.

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Effects of Management Practices on Coffee Productivity and Herbaceous Species Diversity in Agroforestry Systems

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This article discusses how to manage an agroforestry coffee system to maintain crop productivity while also promoting biodiversity in Costa Rica.

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Performance of 45 Native Tree Species on Degraded Lands in Singapore

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This paper evaluates research on the reforestation potential of 45 native tree species in Singapore, with a specific focus on identifying species that can quickly form a closed canopy.

Research Goals & Methods

Annual growth rate and survival was calculated for saplings (total 1640) planted between 1999 and 2004 on seven different sites, 3 dry, 2 average, 2 wet.

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Sustainable Harvest International Reforestation: Annual Report FY2008

Background

The mission of Sustainable Harvest International's reforestation work is to empower local farmers by giving them the knowledge and equipment to improve degraded lands, rebuild diversity in the forest ecosystems, and benefit from the planting of trees.

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The Effect of Rabbit Herbivory on Reforestation of Abandoned Pasture in Southern Costa Rica

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This study considers how mammalian seedling herbivory may limit forest seedling growth abandonded pasture in southern Costa Rica.

Research Goals & Methods

Trees were planted in open pasture and under remnant pasture trees of Inga edulis and Inga punctata.

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Effects of Above- and Below-Ground Competition of Shrubs and Grass on Calophyllum brasiliense (Camb.) Seedling Growth in Abandoned Tropical Pasture

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This article evaluates the above and below-ground competition between grasses, shrubs, and woody seedlings in abandoned pastures in montane Costa Rica.

Research Goals & Methods

One-year-old seedlings of Calophyllum brasilense, a native early-successional tree species, were planted in patches of shrub growth and grass coverage. Seedlings were treated in one of four ways: reduction of root competition, reduction of above-ground competition, reduction of both forms of competition, and control (untreated).

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Rehabilitating Degraded Forest Land in Central Vietnam with Mixed Native Species Plantings

Background

This study considers the imepdiments to reforestation presented by grasses such as Imperata cylindrica. It specifically examined the use of Acacia as a nurse crop to overcome some of the ecological and economic impediments to reforestation of degraded areas dominated by grasses.

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Restoration of a Restinga Sandy Coastal Plain in Brazil: Survival and Growth of Planted Woody Species

Background

Restingas – coastal sandy vegetation – have been affected by human impact for about 8,000 years. Human use of these sites for housing, tourism, and recreation has recently increased in such a way that there is a need for conservation of remnant patches and restoration of degraded areas throughout the coast to protect biodiversity. This study reports the results of an experiment introducing 17 native shrub and tree species into a degraded Brazilian restinga.

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