Restoration and Management Strategies

Manual de reforestación con especies nativas

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Between and Within-Site Comparisons of Structural and Physiological Characteristics and Foliar Nutrient Content of 14 Tree Species at a Wet, Fertile Site and a Dry, Infertile Site in Panama

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This study seeks to analyze how stress resulting from different amounts of precipitation and soil nutrients affects tree growth. The study hypothesized that tree structure and physiology as well as foliar nutrient content would be significantly different between the sites, and trees at the wet, fertile sites would perform better. Secondly, the study hypothesized finding a greater variability of integrated tree growth at the drier site, as plant stress is expected to accentuate differences in performance. Lastly, it was hypothesized that leaf mass area and foliar N would predict photosynthetic capacity.

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Impacts of Herbicide Application and Mechanical Cleanings on Growth and Mortality of Two Timber Species in Saccharum spontaneum Grasslands of the Panama Canal Watershed

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This study evaluates the effectiveness of weed control treatments (herbicide application and mechanical cleanings) in promoting the growth and survival of the exotic tree species Tectona grandis and the native tree species Terminalia amazonia.

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Taking Root Reforestation

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Deforestation is one of the largest contributors to climate change. Based in Montreal, Canada, Taking Root works in Nicaragua to fight deforestation throught market-based approaches.

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Community Based Ecological Mangrove Rehabilitation (CBEMR) in Indonesia

Background

While large-scale wetland/mangrove restoration projects have been successful worldwide efforts in Indonesia have largely failed. This is due to technical issues but also tenure issues. Considering pass projects and attempts, Ecological Mangrove Rehabilitation (EMR) has been identified as a potential best practice for Indonesia.  

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Selecting framework tree species for restoring seasonally dry tropical forests in northern Thailand based on field performance

Background

Framework tree species are indigenous forest tree species, planted to complement and accelerate natural regeneration of forest ecosystems and encourage biodiversity recovery, on degraded sites. This study tests the extent to which 37 native forest tree species might act as framework tree species to accelerate recovery of evergreen, seasonal forest in a degraded upper watershed in Doi Suthep-Pui National Park in northern Thailand.

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Growth of native forest species planted on abandoned pasture land in Costa Rica

Background

Reforestation programs in Costa Rica have largely utilized only four tree species. This study tests growth rates and form of eleven additional tree species native to the humid tropics, including five N-fixing species and six non-N-fixing species.

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Screening trial of 14 tropical hardwoods with an emphasis on species native to Costa Rica: Fourth year results

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Commercial forestry plantations have consistently relied on a limitd number of species, often favoring exotic species over native ones. This is mainly due to a lack of information or understanding related to the silviculture of native species plantations. This article uses a long-term experiement site in Costa Rica's La Selva Biological Station to work towards filling this knowledge gap. 

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Effect of Nurse Tree Species on Early Growth of Anisoptera marginata Korth. (Dipterocarpaceae) on an Imperata cylindrica (L.) Beauv. Grassland Site in South Kalimantan, Indonesia

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This study evaluates the survival of Anisoptera marginata, a native dipterocarp species, underplanted in four year old plantations of fast-growing exotics: Acadia crassicarpa, Acacia mangium, Gmelina arborea, Paraserianthes falcataria.

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Mangrove reforestation in Vietnam: the effect of sediment physicochemical properties on nutrient cycling

Background

Mangrove forests depend on unique physicochemical properties found in tidal coastal sites. One of the main reasons why mangrove reforestation fails is due to changes in the sediment properties that occurred under deforestation conditions. The iron sulphides common in mangrove sediments are oxidated to sulphuric acid, drastically lowering the sediment pH. Other changes also take place as nutrients leach. This study assesses the effects of pH and redox potential on phosphorus and nitrogen cycling in reforested mangrove stands in southern Vietnam.

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