Projects

Kibale National Park Rehabilitation Project

Background

Kibale National Park is one of the last remaining tracks of tropical forest in Uganda. It provides great environmental benefits, specifically serving as a home to large populations of primates. The Kibale National Park Rehabilitation Project seeks to protect these benefits.

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Vilcanota Valley Rehabilitation and Management Project

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Programa Nacional Para La Conservaction, Restauracion y Manejo Der Ecosistema De Bosque Seco En Nicaragua

 

 

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Emerging Threats and Opportunities for Large-Scale Ecological Restoration in the Atlantic Forest of Brazil

background

This article presents a policy model known as the Atlantic Forest Restoration Pact (AFRP) and discusses the vital role the Brazilian Forest Act and other legislation has played in preventing deforestation and encouraging reforestation.

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New Options for Land Rehabilitation and Landscape Ecology in Southeast Asia by "Rainforestation Farming"

background

The authors describe a methodology for reforestation called "Rainforestation Farming" developed in the Philippines in the 1990s to restore forest cover on degraded lands covered with Imperata cylindrica grass in the Visayas region

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Central Kalimantan Peatlands Project

BACKGROUND

The Central Kalimantan Peatlands Project (CKPP) grows out of an increasing recognition at the local, national and international levels of the urgency of halting and reversing degradation of the peatswamp forests of Central Kalimantan, Indonesia. Drainage, illegal logging and fire devastated the area’s peatswamps in recent decades, and the impacts on local livelihoods, the broader economy and critical wildlife habitats have been staggering. 

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Low technology tree propagation and the restoration of natural forest ecosystems

Background

This chapter outlines the need for reforestation in Southeast Asia, with a focus on Thailand, and describes the nursery and propagation processes necessary for successful production of native species for reforestation. The paper focuses mainly on the Forest Restoration Research Unit (FORRU), which was established to address the need for information on native species for reforestation, especially information on seedlings and nursery practices. Most information on propagation available before the creation of FORRU referred to exotic species.

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Tropical Forest Restoration within Galapagos National Park: Application of a State-transition Model

Background

Few restoration models address ecological and management issues across the vegetation mosaic of a landscape. Because of a lack of scientific knowledge and funds, restoration practitioners focus instead on site-specific prescriptions and reactive rather than proactive approaches to restoration; this approach often dooms restoration projects to failure. This synthesis article tests a state-transition model as a decision-making tool to identify and achieve short- and long-term restoration goals.

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Landscape Rehabilitation of Degraded Tropical Forest Ecosystems: Case Study of the CIFOR/Japan Project in Indonesia and Peru

background

The CIFOR/Japan project on tropical forest restoration involves three principal components: 1) evaluation of logging impacts on forest systems, 2) development of methods for the restoration of logged and degraded forests, and 3) development of silvicultural practices for degraded forests.

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Restoration of degraded forest land in Thailand: the case of Khao Kho

Background

This chapter discusses the deforestation of Khao Kho district, situated in Thailand’s central highlands, in the 1970s and restoration efforts in the 1990s. Over 75% of the district was forested until 1968, when as a counterinsurgency strategy the Royal Thai Army began to build roads, deforest the district and encourage agricultural settlement in this heretofore intact forest. Deforestation and maize cultivation on these steep hillsides, often with already-poor soil quality degraded in situ, led to rapid degradation with farming untenable by 1990. A UNDP-funded reforestation project – managed by the Army – was initiated in 1990.

Open access copy available
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